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Ethnicity Estimate From Family Tree DNA

RELATIONSHIPS TO BRITISH MONARCHS

To: Eric Glosser, His Siblings & All 1st Cousins on the Cornell Side of Family

House of Normandy

King William I, the Conqueror (28th Great Grandfather) 1066 to 1087

King William II, Rufus (28th Great Uncle) 1087 to 1100

King Henry I  (27th Great Grandfather) 1100 to 1135

House of Blois

King Stephen (1st Cousin 28x removed) 1135 to 1154

House of Anjou

King Henry II (25th Great Grandfather) 1154 to 1189

King Richard I the Lionheart (25th Great Uncle) 1189 to 1199

King John I (24th Great Grandfather) 1199 to 1216

House of Plantagenet

King Henry III  (24th Great Uncle) 1216 to 1272

King Edward I (1st Cousin 24x removed) 1272 to 1307

King Edward II (2nd Cousin 23x removed) 1307 to 1327

King Edward III (3rd Cousin 22x removed) 1327 to 1377

King Richard II (5th Cousin 20x removed) 1377 to 1399

House of Lancaster

King Henry IV (5th Cousin 20x removed) 1399 to 1413

King Henry V (6th Cousin 19x removed) 1413 to 1422

King Henry VI (7th Cousin 18 x removed) 1422 to 1461

House of York

King Edward IV (7th Cousin 18x removed) 1461 to 1470 & 1471 to 1483

King Edward V (8th Cousin 17x removed) 1470 to 1471

King Richard III (7th Cousin 18x removed) 1483 to 1485

House of Tudor

King Henry VII (8th Cousin 17x removed) 1485 to 1509

King Henry VIII (9th Cousin 16x removed) 1509 to 1547

King Edward VI (10th Cousin 15x removed) 1547 to 1553

Queen Mary I (Bloody Mary) (10th Cousin 15x removed) 1553 to 1558

Queen Elizabeth (10th Cousin 15x removed) 1558 to 1603

House of Stuart

King James I (12th Cousin 13x removed) 1603 to 1625

King Charles I (13th Cousin 12x removed) 1625 to 1649

King Charles II (14th Cousin 11x removed) 1660 to 1685

King James II (14th Cousin 11x removed) 1685 to 1688

Queen Mary II (15th Cousin 10x removed) 1689 to 1694

King William III (Husband of Queen Mary 15th Cousin 10x removed) 1694 to 1702

Queen Anne (15th Cousin 10x removed) 1702 to 1714

House of Hanover (1714–1901)

King George I (15th Cousin 10x removed) 1714 to 1727

King George II (16th Cousin 9x removed) 1727 to 1760

King George III (18th Cousin 7x removed) 1760 to 1820

King George IV (19th Cousin 6x removed) 1820 to 1830

King William IV (19th Cousin 6x removed) 1830 to 1837

Queen Victoria (20th Cousin 5x removed) 1837 to 1901

Houses of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1901–1917) and Windsor (from 1917)

King Edward VII (21st Cousin 4x removed) 1901 to 1910

King George V (22nd Cousin 3x removed) 1910 to 1936

King Edward VIII (23rd Cousin 2x removed) 1936 to 1936

King George VI (23rd Cousin 2x removed) 1936 to 1952

Queen Elizabeth II (24th Cousin 1x removed) 1952 to Present

Prince Charles (25th Cousin) 1st in Line

Prince William (25th Cousin 1x removed) 2nd in Line

Charlemagne (King of the Franks)

AKA: Charles the Great

38th Great Grandfather

Charlemagne (Charles the Great) was king of the Franks and Christian emperor of the West. He did much to define the shape and character of medieval Europe and presided over the Carolingian Renaissance.

Charlemagne was born in the late 740s near Liège in modern day Belgium, the son of the Frankish king Pepin the Short. When Pepin died in 768, his kingdom was divided between his two sons and for three years Charlemagne ruled with his younger brother Carloman. When Carloman died suddenly in 771, Charlemagne became sole ruler.

Charlemagne spent the early part of his reign on several military campaigns to expand his kingdom. He invaded Saxony in 772 and eventually achieved its total conquest and conversion to Christianity. He also extended his dominance to the south, conquering the kingdom of the Lombards in northern Italy. In 778, he invaded northern Spain, then controlled by the Moors. Between 780 and 800, Charlemagne added Bohemia to his empire and subdued the Avars in the middle Danube basin to form a buffer state for the eastern border of his empire.

In 800 a rebellion against Pope Leo III began. Charlemagne went to his aid in Rome and defeated the rebellion. As a token of thanks, Leo crowned Charlemagne on Christmas Day that year, declaring him emperor of the Romans. Although this did not give Charlemagne any new powers, it legitimised his rule over his Italian territories and attempted to revive the imperial tradition of the western Roman emperor.

The immense territories which Charlemagne controlled became known as the Carolingian empire. Charlemagne introduced administrative reforms throughout the lands he controlled, establishing key representatives in each region and holding a general assembly each year at his court at Aachen. He standardised weights, measures and customs dues, which helped improve commerce and initiated important legal reforms. He also attempted to consolidate Christianity throughout his vast empire. He persuaded many eminent scholars to come to his court and established a new library of Christian and classical works.

Charlemagne died in 814. His successors lacked his vision and authority, and his empire did not long outlive him.

Louis the Pious (King of the Franks)

37th Great Grandfather

Son of Charlemagne

Charlemagne “Charles II” The Bald King of the Franks

37th Great Grandfather

Grandson of Charlemagne

RELATIONSHIPS TO U.S. PRESIDENTS

To: Eric Glosser, His Siblings & All 1st Cousins on the Cornell Side of Family

George Washington

16th Cousin 3x Removed

1st President of the United States

Carper / Samples Line

Augustine WashingtonFather of George Washington
Mildred WarnerMother of Augustine Washington
Augustine Warner Jr.Father of Mildred Warner
Elizabeth SothertonMother of Augustine Warner Jr.
Ann PeckMother of Elizabeth Sotherton
Thomas PeckFather of Ann Peck
John PeckFather of Thomas Peck
Richard Peck Jr.Father of John Peck
Joan HarringtonMother of Richard Peck Jr.
Matilda Maude CliffordMother of Joan Harrington
Joan DacreMother of Matilda Maude Clifford
Thomas DacreFather of Joan Dacre
Mary Joan DouglasMother of Thomas Dacre
William DouglasFather of Mary Joan Douglas
Beatrice LindsayMother of William Douglas
Beatrix StewartDaughter of Beatrice Lindsay
Robert ErksineSon of Beatrix Stewart
Christina ErksineDaughter of Robert Erksine
Christiana CrichtonDaughter of Christina Erksine
Robert Colville IIISon of Christiana Crichton
Margaret ColvilleDaughter of Robert Colville III
Gabriel SamplesSon of Margaret Colville
Gabriel SamplesSon of Gabriel Samples
John SamplesSon of Gabriel Samples
William SamplesSon of John Samples
Robert SamplesSon of William Samples
William SamplesSon of Robert Samples
John C. SamplesSon of William Samples
Samuel Alexander Samples Sr.Son of John C. Samples
Samuel Alexander Samples Jr.Son of Samuel Alexander Samples Sr.
Priscilla SamplesDaughter of Samuel Alexander Jr.
Jane Dicena PaxtonDaughter of Priscilla Samples
Walter Van BurenSon of Jane Dicena Paxton
Eva Sue CarperDaughter of Walter Van Buren
Mary Alice CornellDaughter of Eva Sue Carper
Eric E GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States. “As the first of every thing, in our situation will serve to establish a Precedent,” he wrote James Madison, “it is devoutly wished on my part, that these precedents may be fixed on true principles.”

Born in 1732 into a Virginia planter family, he learned the morals, manners, and body of knowledge requisite for an 18th century Virginia gentleman.

He pursued two intertwined interests: military arts and western expansion. At 16 he helped survey Shenandoah lands for Thomas, Lord Fairfax. Commissioned a lieutenant colonel in 1754, he fought the first skirmishes of what grew into the French and Indian War. The next year, as an aide to Gen. Edward Braddock, he escaped injury although four bullets ripped his coat and two horses were shot from under him.

From 1759 to the outbreak of the American Revolution, Washington managed his lands around Mount Vernon and served in the Virginia House of Burgesses. Married to a widow, Martha Dandridge Custis, he devoted himself to a busy and happy life. But like his fellow planters, Washington felt himself exploited by British merchants and hampered by British regulations. As the quarrel with the mother country grew acute, he moderately but firmly voiced his resistance to the restrictions.

When the Second Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia in May 1775, Washington, one of the Virginia delegates, was elected Commander in Chief of the Continental Army. On July 3, 1775, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, he took command of his ill-trained troops and embarked upon a war that was to last six grueling years.

He realized early that the best strategy was to harass the British. He reported to Congress, “we should on all Occasions avoid a general Action, or put anything to the Risque, unless compelled by a necessity, into which we ought never to be drawn.” Ensuing battles saw him fall back slowly, then strike unexpectedly. Finally in 1781 with the aid of French allies–he forced the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown.

Washington longed to retire to his fields at Mount Vernon. But he soon realized that the Nation under its Articles of Confederation was not functioning well, so he became a prime mover in the steps leading to the Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia in 1787. When the new Constitution was ratified, the Electoral College unanimously elected Washington President.

He did not infringe upon the policy making powers that he felt the Constitution gave Congress. But the determination of foreign policy became preponderantly a Presidential concern. When the French Revolution led to a major war between France and England, Washington refused to accept entirely the recommendations of either his Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, who was pro-French, or his Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, who was pro-British. Rather, he insisted upon a neutral course until the United States could grow stronger.

To his disappointment, two parties were developing by the end of his first term. Wearied of politics, feeling old, he retired at the end of his second. In his Farewell Address, he urged his countrymen to forswear excessive party spirit and geographical distinctions. In foreign affairs, he warned against long-term alliances.

Washington enjoyed less than three years of retirement at Mount Vernon, for he died of a throat infection December 14, 1799. For months the Nation mourned him.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.

Thomas Jefferson

11th Cousin 8x Removed

3rd President of the United States

Carper / Samples Line

Jane RandolphMother of Thomas Jefferson
Isham RandolphFather of Jane Randolph
William RandolphFather of Isham Randolph
Richard RandolphFather of William Randolph
Dorothy LaneMother of Richard Randolph
Richard LaneFather of Dorothy Lane
Francis LaneFather of Richard Lane
John LaneFather of Francis Lane
Richard LaneFather of John Lane
Ralph LaneFather of Richard Lane
Margery EgertonMother of Ralph Lane
Ralph EgertonFather of Margery Egerton
Ellen EgertonDaughter of Ralph Egerton
Elizabeth DelvesDaughter of Ellen Egerton
John AstonSon of Elizabeth Delves
Edward AstonJohn Aston
Leonard AstonEdward Aston
Walter AstonSon of Leonard Aston
Mary AstonDaughter of Walter Aston
Richard CockeSon of Mary Aston
Anne CockeDaughter of Richard Cocke
Mary Ann BollingDaughter of Ann Cocke
Elizabeth StarkDaughter of Mary Ann Bolling
Mary Ann WalkerDaughter of Robert Walker
Janetta SamplesDaughter of Mary Ann Walker
Priscilla SamplesDaughter of Janetta Samples
Jane Dicena PaxtonDaughter of Priscilla Samples
Walter Van BurenSon of Jane Dicena Paxton
Eva Sue CarperDaughter of Walter Van Buren
Mary Alice CornellDaughter of Eva Sue Carper
Eric E GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

In the thick of party conflict in 1800, Thomas Jefferson wrote in a private letter, “I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”

This powerful advocate of liberty was born in 1743 in Albemarle County, Virginia, inheriting from his father, a planter and surveyor, some 5,000 acres of land, and from his mother, a Randolph, high social standing. He studied at the College of William and Mary, then read law. In 1772 he married Martha Wayles Skelton, a widow, and took her to live in his partly constructed mountaintop home, Monticello.

Freckled and sandy-haired, rather tall and awkward, Jefferson was eloquent as a correspondent, but he was no public speaker. In the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Continental Congress, he contributed his pen rather than his voice to the patriot cause. As the “silent member” of the Congress, Jefferson, at 33, drafted the Declaration of Independence. In years following he labored to make its words a reality in Virginia. Most notably, he wrote a bill establishing religious freedom, enacted in 1786.

Jefferson succeeded Benjamin Franklin as minister to France in 1785. His sympathy for the French Revolution led him into conflict with Alexander Hamilton when Jefferson was Secretary of State in President Washington’s Cabinet. He resigned in 1793.

Sharp political conflict developed, and two separate parties, the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans, began to form. Jefferson gradually assumed leadership of the Republicans, who sympathized with the revolutionary cause in France. Attacking Federalist policies, he opposed a strong centralized Government and championed the rights of states.

As a reluctant candidate for President in 1796, Jefferson came within three votes of election. Through a flaw in the Constitution, he became Vice President, although an opponent of President Adams. In 1800 the defect caused a more serious problem. Republican electors, attempting to name both a President and a Vice President from their own party, cast a tie vote between Jefferson and Aaron Burr. The House of Representatives settled the tie. Hamilton, disliking both Jefferson and Burr, nevertheless urged Jefferson’s election.

When Jefferson assumed the Presidency, the crisis in France had passed. He slashed Army and Navy expenditures, cut the budget, eliminated the tax on whiskey so unpopular in the West, yet reduced the national debt by a third. He also sent a naval squadron to fight the Barbary pirates, who were harassing American commerce in the Mediterranean. Further, although the Constitution made no provision for the acquisition of new land, Jefferson suppressed his qualms over constitutionality when he had the opportunity to acquire the Louisiana Territory from Napoleon in 1803.

During Jefferson’s second term, he was increasingly preoccupied with keeping the Nation from involvement in the Napoleonic wars, though both England and France interfered with the neutral rights of American merchantmen. Jefferson’s attempted solution, an embargo upon American shipping, worked badly and was unpopular.

Jefferson retired to Monticello to ponder such projects as his grand designs for the University of Virginia. A French nobleman observed that he had placed his house and his mind “on an elevated situation, from which he might contemplate the universe.”

He died on July 4, 1826.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel  and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.

George Herbert Walker Bush

7th Cousin 2x Removed

41st President of the United States

Carper / Samples Line

Prescott S. BushFather of George H.W. Bush
Samuel P. BushFather of Prescott S. Bush
Harriet Eleanor FayMother of Samuel P. Bush
Susan Montfort ShellmanMother of Harriet Eleanor Fay
Clarissa MunfordMother of Susan Montfort Shellman
Robert MunfordFather of Clarissa Munford
James MunfordFather of Robert Munford
Robert MunfordFather of James Munford
Mary Bayles MunfordDaughter of Robert Munford
Robert WalkerSon of Mary Bayle Munford
Mary Ann WalkerDaughter of Robert Walker
Janetta SamplesDaughter of Mary Ann Walker
Priscilla SamplesDaughter of Janetta Samples
Jane Dicena PaxtonDaughter of Priscilla Samples
Walter Van BurenSon of Jane Dicena Paxton
Eva Sue CarperDaughter of Walter Van Buren
Mary Alice CornellDaughter of Eva Sue Carper
Eric E GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

George Bush brought to the White House a dedication to traditional American values and a determination to direct them toward making the United States “a kinder and gentler nation.” In his Inaugural Address he pledged in “a moment rich with promise” to use American strength as “a force for good.”

Coming from a family with a tradition of public service, George Herbert Walker Bush felt the responsibility to make his contribution both in time of war and in peace. Born in Milton, Massachusetts, on June 12, 1924, he became a student leader at Phillips Academy in Andover. On his 18th birthday he enlisted in the armed forces. The youngest pilot in the Navy when he received his wings, he flew 58 combat missions during World War II. On one mission over the Pacific as a torpedo bomber pilot he was shot down by Japanese antiaircraft fire and was rescued from the water by a U. S. submarine. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for bravery in action.

Bush next turned his energies toward completing his education and raising a family. In January 1945 he married Barbara Pierce. They had six children– George, Robin (who died as a child), John (known as Jeb), Neil, Marvin, and Dorothy.

At Yale University he excelled both in sports and in his studies; he was captain of the baseball team and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. After graduation Bush embarked on a career in the oil industry of West Texas.

Like his father, Prescott Bush, who was elected a Senator from Connecticut in 1952, George became interested in public service and politics. He served two terms as a Representative to Congress from Texas. Twice he ran unsuccessfully for the Senate. Then he was appointed to a series of high-level positions: Ambassador to the United Nations, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Chief of the U. S. Liaison Office in the People’s Republic of China, and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency.

In 1980 Bush campaigned for the Republican nomination for President. He lost, but was chosen as a running mate by Ronald Reagan. As Vice President, Bush had responsibility in several domestic areas, including Federal deregulation and anti-drug programs, and visited scores of foreign countries. In 1988 Bush won the Republican nomination for President and, with Senator Dan Quayle of Indiana as his running mate, he defeated Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis in the general election.

Bush faced a dramatically changing world, as the Cold War ended after 40 bitter years, the Communist empire broke up, and the Berlin Wall fell. The Soviet Union ceased to exist; and reformist President Mikhail Gorbachev, whom Bush had supported, resigned. While Bush hailed the march of democracy, he insisted on restraint in U. S. policy toward the group of new nations.

In other areas of foreign policy, President Bush sent American troops into Panama to overthrow the corrupt regime of General Manuel Noriega, who was threatening the security of the canal and the Americans living there. Noriega was brought to the United States for trial as a drug trafficker.

Bush’s greatest test came when Iraqi President Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, then threatened to move into Saudi Arabia. Vowing to free Kuwait, Bush rallied the United Nations, the U. S. people, and Congress and sent 425,000 American troops. They were joined by 118,000 troops from allied nations. After weeks of air and missile bombardment, the 100-hour land battle dubbed Desert Storm routed Iraq’s million-man army.

Despite unprecedented popularity from this military and diplomatic triumph, Bush was unable to withstand discontent at home from a faltering economy, rising violence in inner cities, and continued high deficit spending. In 1992 he lost his bid for reelection to Democrat William Clinton.

George H. W. Bush passed away on November 30, 2018, at the age of 94.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.

George Walker Bush

8th Cousin 1x Removed

43rd President of the United States

Carper / Samples Line

George H.W. BushFather of George W. Bush
Prescott S. BushFather of George H.W. Bush
Samuel P. BushFather of Prescott S. Bush
Harriet Eleanor FayMother of Samuel P. Bush
Susan Montfort ShellmanMother of Harriet Eleanor Fay
Clarissa MunfordMother of Susan Montfort Shellman
Robert MunfordFather of Clarissa Munford
James MunfordFather of Robert Munford
Robert MunfordFather of James Munford
Mary Bayles MunfordDaughter of Robert Munford
Robert WalkerSon of Mary Bayle Munford
Mary Ann WalkerDaughter of Robert Walker
Janetta SamplesDaughter of Mary Ann Walker
Priscilla SamplesDaughter of Janetta Samples
Jane Dicena PaxtonDaughter of Priscilla Samples
Walter Van BurenSon of Jane Dicena Paxton
Eva Sue CarperDaughter of Walter Van Buren
Mary Alice CornellDaughter of Eva Sue Carper
Eric E GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

The airborne terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the thwarted flight against the White House or Capitol on September 11, 2001, in which nearly 3,000 Americans were killed, transformed George W. Bush into a wartime president. The attacks put on hold many of Bush’s hopes and plans, and Bush’s father, George Bush, the 41st president, declared that his son “faced the greatest challenge of any president since Abraham Lincoln.”

In response, Bush formed a new cabinet-level Department of Homeland Security, sent American forces into Afghanistan to break up the Taliban, a movement under Osama bin Laden that trained financed and exported terrorist teams. The Taliban was successfully disrupted but Bin Laden was not captured and was still on the loose as Bush began his second term. Following the attacks, the president also recast the nation’s intelligence gathering and analysis services, and ordered reform of the military forces to meet the new enemy. At the same time he delivered major tax cuts which had been a campaign pledge. His most controversial act was the invasion of Iraq on the belief that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein posed a grave threat to the United States. Saddam was captured, but the disruption of Iraq and the killing of American servicemen and friendly Iraqis by insurgents became the challenge of Bush’s government as he began his second term. President Bush pledged during his 2005 State of the Union Address that the United States would help the Iraqi people establish a fully democratic government because the victory of freedom in Iraq would strengthen a new ally in the war on terror, bring hope to a troubled region, and lift a threat from the lives of future generations.

Bush was born in New Haven, Connecticut while his father was attending Yale University after service in World War II. The family moved to Midland, Texas, where the senior Bush entered the oil exploration business. The son spent formative years there, attended Midland public schools, and formed friendships that stayed with him into the White House. Bush graduated from Yale, received a business degree from Harvard, and then returned to Midland where he too got into the oil business. In Midland he met and married Laura Welch, a teacher and librarian. They had twin daughters, Jenna and Barbara, now out of college and pursuing careers.

When George W. Bush, at the age of 54, became the 43rd president of the United States, it was only the second time in American history that a president’s son went on to the White House. John Quincy Adams, elected the sixth president in 1824, was the son of John Adams, the second president. While John Adams had groomed his son to be president, George Bush, the 41st president, insisted he was surprised when the eldest of his six children became interested in politics, became governor of Texas, and then went on to the White House.

During the early part of the 2000 campaign for the White House, Bush enjoyed a double-digit lead in the polls over his opponent Vice President Al Gore Jr. But the gap closed as the election approached and though Gore finally won the popular vote by 543,895 votes, victory or loss of the presidency hinged on Florida’s electoral votes. That struggle through recounts and lawsuits worked its way to the Supreme Court. In the end Bush won the electoral count 271 to 266. His new administration was focused on “compassionate conservatism,” which embraced excellence in education, tax relief and volunteerism among faith-based and community organizations.

Bush was challenged in his re-election bid in 2004 by Massachusetts Democratic Senator John Kerry. The election was a good contest, but Bush’s contention that the invasion of Iraq had made the world more secure against terrorism won the national political debate. Bush was re-elected with 51 percent to 48 percent.

On the inaugural stand, George W. Bush set the theme for his second term: “At this second gathering, our duties are defined not by the words I use, but by the history we have seen together. For half a century, America defended our own freedom by standing watch on distant borders. After the shipwreck of communism came years of relative quiet- and then there came a day of fire. There is only one force of history that can break the reign of hatred and resentment, and expose the pretensions of tyrants, and reward the hopes of the decent and tolerant, and that is the force of human freedom – tested but not weary… we are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom.”

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel  and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.

 James “Jimmie” Earl Carter Jr.

(1924 – )

9th Cousin 1x Removed

39th President of the United States of America

Cornell Line

James Earl Carter Sr. (1894-1953)Father of James Earl Carter Jr.
William A. Carter (1858-1903)Father f James Earl Carter Sr.
Littleberry Walker Carter (1832-1873)Father of William A. Carter
Ann Ainsley (1801-1848)Mother of Littleberry Walker Carter
Ann Morris (1772-1838))Mother of Ann Ainsley
Job Morris (1711-1767)Father of Ann Morris
Richard Morris (1682-1742)Father of Job Morris
Elizabeth Almy (1663-1711)Mother of Richard Morris
Elizabeth Cornell (1637-1714)Mother of Elizabeth Almy
Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)Father of Elizabeth Cornell
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 Born on October 1, 1924, in Plains, Georgia, Jimmy Carter was 39th president of the United States (1977-81) and served as the nation’s chief executive during a time of serious problems at home and abroad. Carter’s perceived mishandling of these issues led to defeat in his bid for reelection. He later turned to diplomacy and advocacy, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2002.

Early life

President of the United States of America. James Earl Carter Jr. was born on October 1, 1924 in Plains, Georgia. His father, James Earl Carter Sr., was a hardworking peanut farmer who owned his own small plot of land as well as a warehouse and store. His mother, Bessie Lillian Gordy, was a registered nurse who in the 1920s had crossed racial divides to counsel black women on health care issues. When Jimmy Carter was four years old, the family relocated to Archery, a town approximately two miles from Plains. It was a sparsely populated and deeply rural town, where mule-drawn wagons remained the dominant mode of transportation and electricity and indoor plumbing were still uncommon. Carter was a studious boy who avoided trouble and began working at his father’s store at the age of ten. His favorite childhood pastime was sitting with his father in the evenings, listening to baseball games and politics on the battery-operated radio.

Both of Carter’s parents were deeply religious. They belonged to Plains Baptist Church and insisted that Carter attend Sunday school, which his father occasionally taught. Carter attended the all-white Plains High School while the area’s majority black population received educations at home or at church. Despite this pervasive segregation, two of Carter’s closest childhood friends were African American, as were two of the most influential adults in his life, his nanny Annie Mae Hollis and his father’s worker Jack Clark. While the Great Depression hit most of the rural south very hard, the Carters managed to prosper during these years, and by the late 1930s his father had over 200 workers employed on his farms. In 1941, Jimmy Carter became the first person from his father’s side of the family to graduate from high school.

Carter studied engineering at Georgia Southwestern Junior College before joining the Naval ROTC program to continue his engineering studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He then applied to the highly competitive Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, which accepted him to begin studies in the summer of 1943. With his reflective, introverted personality and small stature (Carter stood only five feet, nine inches tall), he did not fit in well among his fellow midshipmen. Nevertheless, Carter continued to excel at academics, graduating in the top ten percent of his class in 1946. While on leave in the summers, Carter had reconnected with a girl named Rosalynn Smith whom he had known since childhood. They married in June 1946.

The Navy assigned Jimmy Carter to work on submarines, and in the early years of their marriage, the Carters – like many a military family – moved frequently. After a training program in Norfolk, Virginia, they moved out to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, where Carter was an electronics officer on the USS Pomfret. After subsequent postings to Groton, Connecticut; San Diego, California and Washington, D.C., in 1952 Carter was assigned to work with Admiral Hyman Rickover developing a nuclear submarine program in Schenectady, New York. The brilliant and notoriously demanding admiral made a profound impression on Carter. “I think, second to my own father, Rickover had more effect on my life than any other man,” he later said.

During these years, the Carters also had three sons: John William (born 1947), James Earl Carter III (1950) and Donnel Jeffrey (1952). (The Carters later had a daughter, Amy, born in 1967). In July 1953, Carter’s father passed away from pancreatic cancer and in the aftermath of his death, the farm and family business fell into disarray. Although Rosalynn initially objected, Carter moved his family back to rural Georgia so he could care for his mother and take over the family’s affairs. In Georgia, Carter resuscitated the family farm and became active in community politics, winning a seat on the Sumter County Board of Education in 1955 and eventually becoming its chairman.

Taking Office

Carter assumed the presidency in a time of considerable optimism, initially enjoying sky-high approval ratings. Symbolizing his commitment to a new kind of leadership, after his inaugural address Carter got out of his limousine to walk to the White House amongst his supporters. Carter’s main domestic priority involved energy policy. With oil prices rising, and in the aftermath of the 1973 oil embargo, Carter believed it imperative to cure the United States of its dependence on foreign oil. Although Carter succeeded in decreasing foreign oil consumption by eight percent and developing huge emergency stores of oil and natural gas, the Iranian Revolution of 1979 again drove up oil prices and led to long lines at gas stations, overshadowing Carter’s achievements.

Carter’s foreign policy centered around a promise to make human rights a central concern in the United States’ relations with other countries. He suspended economic and military aid to Chile, El Salvador and Nicaragua in protest of those regimes’ human rights abuses. But Carter’s most notable foreign policy achievement was his successful mediation of the Camp David Accords between Israel and Egypt, leading to a historic peace treaty in which Israel withdrew from the Sinai and the two sides officially recognized each other’s governments.

However, despite these noteworthy achievements, Carter’s presidency was widely considered a failure. He had very poor relationships with Congress and the media, stifling his ability to enact legislation or effectively communicate his policies. In 1979 Carter delivered a disastrous speech, referred to as the “Crisis of Confidence” speech, in which he seemed to blame America’s problems on the poor spirit of its people. Several foreign policy blunders also contributed to Carter’s loosening grip on the presidency. His secret negotiations to return the Panama Canal to Panama led many people to believe he was a weak leader who had “given away” the canal without securing necessary provisions for defending U.S. interests.

Iran Hostage Crisis

Probably the biggest factor in Carter’s declining political fortunes, however, was the Iranian Hostage Crisis. In November 1979, radical Iranian students seized the United States Embassy in Tehran, taking 66 Americans hostage. Carter’s failure to negotiate the hostages’ release, followed by a badly botched rescue mission, made him look like an impotent leader who had been outmaneuvered by a group of radical students. The hostages were held for 444 days before finally being released on the day Carter left office.

Ronald Reagan, the former actor and governor of California, challenged Carter for the presidency in 1980. Reagan ran a smooth and effective campaign, simply asking voters, “Are you better off than you were four years ago?” Most were not; Reagan crushed Carter in the 1980 election, which was essentially a referendum on a failed presidency. As the New York Times put it, “On Election Day, Mr. Carter was the issue.”6

Legacy of Humanitarianism

Despite a largely unsuccessful one-term presidency, Jimmy Carter later rehabilitated his reputation through his humanitarian efforts after leaving the White House. He is now widely considered one of the greatest ex-presidents in American history. He has worked extensively with Habitat for Humanity and founded the Carter Presidential Center to promote human rights and alleviate suffering across the globe. In particular, Carter has worked effectively as an ex-president to develop community-based health care systems in Africa and Latin America, to oversee elections in fledgling democracies and to promote peace in the Middle East. In 2002, Jimmy Carter received the Nobel Peace Prize “for his decades of untiring effort to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts, to advance democracy and human rights, and to promote economic and social development.” Carter has also written many books in the years since his presidency, including several memoirs, Our Endangered Values: America’s Moral Crisis (2006) and Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid (2007).

Jimmy Carter will not go down in history as one of America’s most effective presidents. However, because of his tireless work both before and since his presidency in support of equality, human rights and the alleviation of human suffering, Carter will go down as one of the nation’s great social activists. Delivering his Nobel Lecture in 2002, Carter concluded with words that can be seen as both his life mission and his call to action for future generations. “The bond of our common humanity is stronger than the divisiveness of our fears and prejudices,” he said. “God gives us the capacity for choice. We can choose to alleviate suffering. We can choose to work together for peace. We can make these changes – and we must.”

Richard Milhous Nixon

(1885-1967)

9th Cousin 1x Removed

37th President of the United States of America

Cornell Line

Hannah Milhous (1885-1967)Mother of Richard Milhous Nixon
Almira Park Burdge (1849-1943)Mother of Hannah Milhous
Oliver Burdge (1821-1908)Father of Almira Park Burdge
Jacob Burdge Jr. (1783-1862)Father of Oliver Burdge
Jacob Burdge Sr. (1743-1797)Father of Jacob Burdge Jr.
Sarah Morris (1722-1796)Mother of Jacob Burdge Sr.
Richard Morris (1682-1741)Father of Sarah Morris
Elizabeth Almy (1663-1711)Mother of Richard Morris
Elizabeth Cornell (1637-1714)Mother of Elizabeth Almy
Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)Father of Elizabeth Cornell
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 Born on January 9, 1913, in Yorba Linda, California, Richard Nixon was a Republican congressman who served as vice president under Dwight D. Eisenhower. Nixon ran for president in 1960 but lost to charismatic Massachusetts senator John F. Kennedy. Undeterred, Nixon return to the race eight years later and won the White House by a solid margin. In 1974, he resigned rather than be impeached for covering up illegal activities of party members in the Watergate affair. He died on April 22, 1994, at age 81, in New York City.

Early Life and Military Service

Born on January 9, 1913, in Yorba Linda, California, Richard Milhous Nixon was the second of five children born to Frank Nixon and Hannah Milhouse Nixon. His father was a service station owner and grocer, who also owned a small lemon farm in Yorba Linda. His mother was a Quaker who exerted a strong influence on her son. Richard Nixon’s early life was hard, as he characterized by saying, “We were poor, but the glory of it was we didn’t know it.” The family experienced tragedy twice early in Richard’s life: His younger brother died in 1925 after a short illness, and in 1933, his older brother, whom he greatly admired, died of tuberculosis.

Richard Nixon attended Fullerton High School but later transferred to Whittier High School, where he ran for student body president (but lost to a more popular student). Nixon graduated high school second in his class and was offered a scholarship to Harvard, but his family couldn’t afford the travel and living expenses. Instead of Harvard, Nixon attended local Whittier College, a Quaker institution, where he earned a reputation as a formidable debater, a standout in college drama productions and a successful athlete. Upon graduation from Whittier in 1934, Nixon received a full scholarship to Duke University Law School in Durham, N.C. After graduation, Nixon returned to the town of Whittier to practice law at Kroop & Bewley. He soon met Thelma Catherine (“Pat”) Ryan, a teacher and amateur actress, after the two were cast in the same play at a local community theater. The couple married in 1940 and went on to have two daughters, Tricia and Julie.

A career as a small-town lawyer was not enough for a man with Nixon’s ambition, so in August 1942, he and Pat moved to Washington, D.C., where he took a job in Franklin Roosevelt’s Office of Price Administration. He soon became disillusioned with the New Deal’s big-government programs and bureaucratic red tape, though, and left the public service realm for the U.S. Navy (despite his an exemption from military service as a Quaker and in his job with OPA). Serving as an aviation ground officer in the Pacific, Nixon saw no combat, but he returned to the United States with two service stars and several commendations. He eventually rose to the rank of lieutenant commander before resigning his commission in January 1946.

U.S. Congress

Following his return to civilian life, Nixon was approached by a group of Whittier Republicans who encouraged him to run for Congress. Nixon would be up against five-term liberal Democratic Jerry Voorhis, but he took on the challenge head-on. Nixon’s campaign exploited notions about Voorhis’s alleged communist sympathies, a tactic that would recur throughout his political life, and it worked, helping Nixon win a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in November 1946. During his first term, Nixon was assigned to the Select Committee on Foreign Aid and went to Europe to report on the newly enacted Marshall Plan. There he quickly established a reputation as an internationalist in foreign policy.

As a member of the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) from 1948 to 1950, he took a leading role in the investigation of Alger Hiss, a former State Department official with a previously stellar reputation. While many believed Hiss, Nixon took the allegations that Hiss was spying for the Soviet Union to heart. In dramatic testimony before the committee, Hiss vehemently denied the charge and refuted claims made by his accuser, Whittaker Chambers. Nixon brought Hiss to the witness stand, and under stinging cross-examination, Hiss admitted that he had known Chambers, but under a different name. This brought Hiss a perjury charge and five years in prison, while Nixon’s hostile questioning of Hiss during the committee hearings went a long way toward cementing his national reputation as a fervent anti-Communist.

In 1950, Nixon successfully ran for the United States Senate against Democrat Helen Gahagan Douglas. She had been an outspoken opponent of the anti-Communist scare and the actions of HUAC. Employing his previous (successful) campaign tactics, Nixon’s campaign staff distributed flyers on pink paper unfairly distorting Douglas’s voting record as left-wing. For his efforts, The Independent Review, a small Southern California newspaper, nicknamed Nixon “Tricky Dick,” a derogatory nickname that would remain with him for the rest of this life.

Retirement and Death

After his resignation, Richard Nixon retired with his wife to the seclusion of his estate in San Clemente, California, where he spent several months distraught and disoriented. Gradually he regrouped, and by 1977 he began forming a public-relations comeback. In August, Nixon met with British commentator David Frost for a series of interviews during which Nixon sent mixed messages of contrition and pride, while never admitting any wrong-doing. While the interviews were met with mixed reviews, they were watched by many and positively contributed to Nixon’s public image.

In 1978, Nixon published RN: The Memoirs of Richard Nixon, an intensely personal examination of his life, public career and White House years; the book became a best-seller. He also authored several books on international affairs and American foreign policy, modestly rehabilitating his public reputation and earning him a role as an elder foreign-policy expert.

On June 22, 1993, Pat Nixon died of lung cancer. Nixon took the loss hard, and on April 22, 1994, just 10 months after his wife’s death, Richard Nixon died of a massive stroke in New York City. President Bill Clinton was joined by four former presidents to pay homage to the 37th president. His body lay in repose in the Nixon Library lobby, and an estimated 50,000 people waited in a heavy rain for up to 18 hours to file past the casket and pay their last respects. He was buried beside his wife at his birthplace, in Yorba Linda, California.

Frances Cornelia Folsom CLEVELAND

(1864-1947)

8th Cousin 1x Removed

First Lady and Wife of Grover Cleveland 22nd & 24th President of the United States of America

Cornell Line

Emma Cornelia Harmon (1841-1915)Mother of Frances Cordelia Folsom
Ruth Haywood Rogers (1809-1887)Mother of Emma Cordelia Harmon
Mercy Champlin (1783-1857)Mother of Ruth Haywood Rogers
Stephen Champlin III (1763-1848)Father of Mercy Champlin
Stephen Champlin Jr. (1734-1778)Father of Stephen Champlin III
Mary Hazzard (1716-1773)Mother of Stephen Champlin Jr.
Sarah Borden (1694-1765)Mother of Mary Hazzard
Innocent Cornell (1673-1720)Mother of Sarah Borden
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Father of Innocent Cornell
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 Frances Cleveland was born on July 21, 1864, in Buffalo, New York. She married President Grover Cleveland on June 2, 1886. The couple had four daughters and two sons. Grover Cleveland died in 1908, and Frances remarried in 1913. Frances became active in the Needlework Guild during World War I, later serving as its national president from 1925 to 1940. She died on October 29, 1947, in Baltimore, Maryland.

Early Years

Frances Cleveland was born Frances Clara Folsom on July 21, 1864, in Buffalo, New York. Her father, an attorney named Oscar, died in a carriage accident two days after Frances’ ninth birthday. Her mother, Emma Harmon, would eventually remarry. Frances had one sibling, a sister named Nellie.

Frances received her early education at Miss Bissell’s School for Young Ladies, followed by the Medina Academy for Boys and Girls. She left Central [High] School in Buffalo in her senior year, but completed the necessary coursework to earn her diploma. In 1882 she enrolled at Wells College in Aurora, New York. After graduating in 1885, Frances and her mother spent nine months traveling throughout Europe.

First Lady

In the spring of 1885, while visiting Washington, D.C., with her mother, Frances received a marriage proposal from Grover Cleveland, the president of the United States. Upon returning from her trip to Europe, at 21 years old, Frances married the president in the White House’s Blue Room on June 2, 1886. By doing so, Frances became the youngest-ever American first lady. She was also the only first lady ever to have been married at the White House.

After the newlyweds came home from their honeymoon in Maryland, Frances took over the title of first lady, which Grover’s younger sister, Libbie, had assumed for the previous 14 months.

A statuesque beauty, Frances quickly became America’s sweetheart. Before long, companies were asking her to endorse their products, somewhat to the chagrin of her husband, who feared for her safety as she was increasingly surrounded by throngs of admirers. When she accompanied the president on his tour of the southern and western United States in 1887, it only served to further her celebrity. After appearing on the covers of Harper’s and Leslie’sthat year, “Frankie” became a fashion trendsetter for women all over the country.

Frances supported projects in Washington, including the Women’s Christian Temperance Movement’s “Hope and Help Project,” and helped establish the Washington Home for Friendless Colored Girls.

Grover Cleveland’s first term ended in 1889, and he would not take office for his second (noncontinuous) term until January 1893. In the interim, Frances gave birth to a daughter, Ruth (1891). She was pregnant again by the time her husband started his second term and gave birth to another daughter, Ester, in September 1893. During Cleveland’s second term, the family welcomed a third daughter, Marion (1895), to the world.

After the White House

When Cleveland’s second term ended in January 1897, the family moved to Princeton, New Jersey, and later that year Frances gave birth to the couple’s first son, Richard. Francis, the couple’s second son, was born in 1903, but, tragically, a year later, her 12-year-old daughter, Ruth, died of diphtheria.

Grover Cleveland died on June 24, 1908. Frances remarried, to art history professor Thomas Jex Preston Jr., in February of 1913. In 1915, after moving to London, the couple became involved in the National Security League. 

During World War I, Frances became active in the Needlework Guild. She later served as national president of the organization from 1925 to 1940.

Frances Cleveland died on October 29, 1947, in Baltimore, Maryland. She lived longer than any other first lady had after leaving the White House.Other Famous Relatives

 John Forbes Kerry

(1943-)

10th Cousin

Former United States Secretary of State

Cornell Line

Rosemary Isabel Forbes (1913-2002)Mother of John Forbes Kerry
James Grant Forbes Sr. (1879-1955)Father of Rosemary Isabel Forbes
Francis Blackwell Forbes (1839-1908)Father of James Grant Forbes Sr.
John Murray Forbes (1807-1885)Father of Francis Blackwell Forbes
Frances Elizabeth Blackwell (1780-1845)Mother of John Murray Forbes
Joseph Blackwell Sr. (1744-1808)Father of Frances Elizabeth Blackwell
Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr. (1717-1780)Father of Joseph Blackwell Sr.
Mary Hallett (1687-1743)Mother of Jacob Frances Blackwell Jr.
Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)Mother of Mary Hallett
Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)Mother of Sarah Woosley
Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)Father of Rebecca Cornell
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 In 2004, Kerry won the Democratic nomination for president. He focused much of his campaign efforts on criticizing President George W. Bush. Kerry opposed Bush’s foreign policy, particularly in its handling of the Iraq war. Though Kerry voted to give the president authority to wage war in Iraq, he subsequently voted against an $87 billion aid package for the country. Kerry reasons that Bush misused the trust that Congress placed in him, and continues to criticize the president for “squandering the goodwill of the world after September 11.”

In July, Kerry chose North Carolina senator and former trial lawyer John Edwards as his running mate. Later that month, Kerry and Edwards were joined by speakers Bill and Hillary Clinton, Jimmy Carter, Madeline Albright and others at the Democratic National Convention in Boston. In November 2004, after a hard-fought and often bitter campaign, Kerry conceded the presidential election to incumbent George W. Bush.

Secretary of State

After his failed presidential bid, Kerry continued to be a strong presence in the U.S. Senate. He became chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 2009. In 2011, Kerry was asked to help sort out the nation’s fiscal problems as a member of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction.

In December 2012, President Barack Obama nominated Kerry to be his next secretary of state. Kerry succeeded Hillary Clinton who previously held the post. Obama considered Kerry to be the ideal candidate for the job with his decades of political experience. “John’s played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years,” Obama said in a press conference, according to CNN.

Kerry’s nomination was approved by the vast majority of the Senate with a 94 to 3 vote on January 29, 2013. His years on experience with matters of foreign policy will prove to be a great asset for his new job. As his fellow Democrat, Senator Bob Menendez, explained, “Kerry will need no introduction to the world’s political and military leaders.” The new secretary of state “will begin Day 1 fully conversant not only with the intricacies of U.S. foreign policy, but able to act on a multitude of international stages,” Menendez added, according to a report by The Associated Press.

One of Kerry’s great challenges as secretary of state has been the conflict in Syria between rebels and the government led by Bashar al-Assad. In late August 2013, he confirmed that chemical weapons had been used on civilians by al-Assad’s forces. The use of these weapons “defies any code of morality,” Kerry told the press, according to U.S. News & World Report. “The indiscriminate slaughter of civilians, the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity.” Kerry warned that President Obama believes that the Syrian government must be held accountable for this brutal and senseless act.

Following Obama’s announcement in regards to the likelihood of a strike on Syria by the U.S., Russia—among other nations—agreed to negotiate a plan to have Syria release its chemical weapons. Kerry made an announcement during a joint press conference with Russian diplomat Sergey Lavrov on September 10, 2013, saying that the negotiations for a deal with Syria were underway, and while there were many expectations within the agreement, it was still a solution that he believed could be reached. However, he also expressed that the U.S. taking military action against Syria was still an option.

Later that month, Kerry met the Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. This marked the first time in years that high-ranking officials from the two countries had engaged in talks. This move, along with letters exchanged between President Barack Obama and Iranian leader Hassan Rouhani, may indicate a possible thawing in U.S.-Iranian relations.

Kerry’s diplomatic efforts with Iran began to pay off in November 2013. The United States reached an agreement with Iran regarding its nuclear program. In this deal, Iran has pledged to curb its uranium enrichment program in exchange for an easing of sanctions against Iran. On the television programState of the Union, Kerry answered critics, such as Israel, of this accord. “We believe very strongly that because the Iranian nuclear program is actually set backwards and is actually locked into place in critical places, that that is better for Israel than if you were just continuing to go down the road and they rush towards a nuclear weapon,” he said.

Personal Life

In 1995, Kerry married Teresa Heinz, who is the widow of former Senator John Heinz and heir to the Heinz fortune. Kerry has two daughters from a previous marriage, Alexandra and Vanessa. Teresa has three sons, John, Andre and Christopher. The couple lives in Boston.

 Thomas Richard Carper

(1947-)

6th Cousin 1x Removed

United States Senator of Delaware

Carper Line

Wallace Richard Carper (1919-1992)Father of Thomas Richard Carper
Franklin Pierce Carper (1889-1958)Father of Wallace Richard Carper
Samuel Harrington Walker Carper (1847-1927)Father of Franklin Pierce Carper
Joseph W. Carper Sr. (1802-1880)Father of Samuel Harrington Walker Carper
Isaac Carper (1777-1838)Father of Joseph W. Carper Sr.
Johann Jacob Carper (1748-1829)Father of Isaac Carper
Margaretha Barbara Marsteller (1709-1758)Mother of Johann Jacob Carper
Nicholas Carper (1749-1813)Father of Margaretha Barbara Marsteller
Jacob Carper (1774-1827)Son of Nicholas Carper
Nicholas Carper II (1799-1886)Son of Jacob Carper
Miles Monroe Carper (1846-1927)Son of Nicholas Carper
Walter Van Buren Carper (1873-1952)Son of Miles Monroe Carper
Eva Sue Carper (1897-1973)Daughter of Walter Van Buren Carper
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of Eva Sue Carper
Eric GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 Born in West Virginia and raised in Virginia, Senator Tom Carper attended The Ohio State University on a Navy R.O.T.C. scholarship, graduating in 1968 with a B.A. in economics. He went on to complete five years of service as a naval flight officer, serve three tours of duty in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War, and continued to serve in the Naval Reserve as a P-3 aircraft mission commander until retiring with the rank of captain in 1991 after 23 years of military service. With the war winding down in Southeast Asia, Tom Carper moved to Delaware in 1973 where he earned his M.B.A. at the University of Delaware.

His career in public service began in 1976 when he was elected to the first of three terms as Delaware’s state treasurer at the age of 29 at a time when the state of Delaware had the worst credit rating of any state in America. Six years later, with that credit rating restored to a respectable “AA,” he ran for – and was elected – to Delaware’s at-large seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

After serving five terms as a U.S. congressman, where he earned a reputation as a results-oriented centrist, Tom Carper was elected the 78th governor of Delaware in 1992 and served two terms in that role. As governor, he pursued a common-sense agenda that led to eight balanced budgets, tax cuts in seven of those eight years, and major increases in employment. Governor Carper led the effort to strengthen the state’s “rainy day” fund and boost Delaware’s credit rating to “AAA” for the first time in state history, while helping to overhaul the state’s education system and to implement welfare reform initiatives in Delaware and the nation.

During his second term as governor, Tom Carper was selected by his colleagues to serve as vice-chairman, then as chairman, of the National Governors’ Association (NGA). After serving as chairman, he led the NGA’s ‘Center for Best Practices,’ which focused on developing and implementing innovative solutions to policy challenges faced by governors across the nation. From 1994-1998, he served as a member of Amtrak’s board of directors and, later, as founding vice-chairman of the American Legacy Foundation to combat youth smoking and as vice-chairman of Jobs for America’s Graduates, a national non-profit to reduce high school dropouts.

On Jan. 3, 2001, Governor Carper stepped down two weeks early to become Delaware’s junior senator. He was reelected in 2006, and with his reelection in November 2012 he has been elected to state-wide public office in Delaware 13 times. When Senator Joe Biden stepped down to become vice president in January 2009, Tom Carper became Delaware’s senior senator.

Senator Carper is ranking member of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, after serving as chairman in the 113th Congress. In that capacity, he focuses on protecting our country from threats to our national security as well as ensuring federal government programs are efficient and using taxpayer dollars wisely. Additionally, he is fighting to save the U.S. Postal Service and to strengthen our nation’s cybersecurity. He also serves on the Finance Committee and Environment and Public Works Committee, where he is ranking member on the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety.

In his time in the U.S. Senate, Senator Carper has worked extensively on reforming our health care system, improving our environment, and ensuring that federal programs are run efficiently and effectively. As a member of the Senate Finance Committee, Senator Carper helped craft the Affordable Care Act with a focus on how to improve our health care system by reducing costs, getting better results, and empowering consumers with the tools and resources they need to achieve better health and wellness. Senator Carper fought to include provisions on workplace wellness and menu labeling in the health care reform law, and he continues to be a leader in ensuring that the Affordable Care Act is implemented effectively. As a member of the Environment and Public Works Committee, Senator Carper fought to protect our environment and clean up our air. He successfully defended common sense clean air regulations from misguided attempts to repeal them, and he continues to push for meaningful protections that limit carbon pollution, regulate cross-state air pollution and help stem the tide of climate change. He led the effort to pass the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act with Sen. George Voinovich (R-Ohio) which has cleaned up millions of old, dirty diesel engines to help save lives and improve public health, and he helped broker the compromise that created our country’s highest fuel efficiency standards in a generation, saving Americans millions at the pump.  All in all, he worked to advocate for common sense policies to clean our air, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, and improve public health.  As ranking member of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, he continues to champion postal reform with the goal of protecting the U.S. Postal Service from collapse and ensuring it remains a robust American institution for generations to come.  He has also coauthored legislation to help reduce the number of mistake payments made by the federal government and to enhance the federal government’s transparency efforts. 

During more than 30 years of public service, Senator Carper has worked tirelessly to develop practical solutions to real problems. His ability to work across party lines has earned him a reputation for consensus-building that is unique in today’s political climate. The Washington Post‘s late David Broder calls him “a notably effective and non-partisan leader, admired and trusted on both sides of the aisle.”

Sir Winston Churchill

1874-1965

Carper / Samples Line

Winston Churchill was born on 30 November 1874, in Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire and was of rich, aristocratic ancestry. Although achieving poor grades at school, his early fascination with militarism saw him join the Royal Cavalry in 1895. As a soldier and part-time journalist, Churchill travelled widely, including trips to Cuba, Afghanistan, Egypt and South Africa.

Churchill was elected as Conservative MP for Oldham in 1900, before defecting to the Liberal Party in 1904 and spending the next decade climbing the ranks of the Liberal government. He was First Lord of the Admiralty (the civil/political head of the Royal Navy) by the time of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign, which he created. Heavily criticised for this error, he resigned from this position and travelled to the Western Front to fight himself.

The interwar years saw Churchill again ‘cross the floor’ from the Liberals, back to the Conservative Party. He served as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1924, when he controversially opted for Britain to re-join the Gold Standard. Following the Tory electoral defeat in 1929, Churchill lost his seat and spent much of the next 11 years out of office, mainly writing and making speeches. Although he was alone in his firm opposition to Indian Independence, his warnings against the Appeasement of Nazi Germany were proven correct when the Second World War broke out in 1939.

Following Neville Chamberlain’s resignation in 1940, Churchill was chosen to succeed him as Prime Minister of an all-party coalition government.

Churchill, who also adopted the self-created position of Minister for Defence, was active both in administrative and diplomatic functions in prosecuting the British war effort. Some of his most memorable speeches were given in this period, and are credited with stimulating British morale during periods of great hardship. However, Labour leader Clement Attlee’s unexpected General Election victory in 1945 saw Churchill out of office and once again concentrating on public speaking. In his 1946 speech in the USA, the instinctive pro-American famously declared that “an iron curtain has descended across the Continent”, and warned of the continued danger from a powerful Soviet Russia.

By his re-election in 1951, Churchill was, in the words of Roy Jenkins, “gloriously unfit for office”. Ageing and increasingly unwell, he often conducted business from his bedside, and while his powerful personality and oratory ability endured, the Prime Minister’s leadership was less decisive than during the war. His second term was most notable for the Conservative Party’s acceptance of Labour’s newly created Welfare State, and Churchill’s effect on domestic policy was limited. His later attempts at decreasing the developing Cold War through personal diplomacy failed to produce significant results, and poor health forced him to resign in 1955, making way for his Foreign Secretary and Deputy Prime Minister, Anthony Eden.

Churchill died in 1965, and was honored with a state funeral.

 William Henry “Bill” Gates III

(1955-)

10th Cousin 2x Removed

Microsoft Founder / Billionaire

Cornell Line

Mary A. Maxwell (1929-1994)Mother of William Henry “Bill” Gates III
James Willard Maxwell Jr. (1901-1960)Father of Mary A. Maxwell
James Willard Maxwell Sr. (1864-1951)Father of James Willard Maxwell Jr.
Louisa Mary Woodworth (1842-1900)Mother of James Willard Maxwell Sr.
Emeline Keeler Brush (1821-1901)Mother of Louisa Mary Woodworth
George Phillips Brush (1775-1829)Father of Emeline Keeler Brush
Hannah Phillips (1752-1839)Mother of George Phillips Brush
Samuel Phillips (1728-1805)Father of Hannah Phillips
George Phillips Jr. (1698-1771)Father of Samuel Phillips
Sarah Elizabeth Hallett (1672-1730)Mother of George Phillips Jr.
Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)Mother of Sarah Elizabeth Hallett
Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)Mother of Sarah Woosley
Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)Father of Rebecca Cornell
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

Personal Life

In 1989, a 28-year-old Microsoft executive named Melinda French caught the eye of Bill Gates, then 37. The very bright and organized Melinda was a perfect match for Gates. In time, their relationship grew as they discovered an intimate and intellectual connection. On January 1, 1994, Melinda and Bill were married in Hawaii. But only a few months later heartbreak struck Bill Gates as his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. She died in June 1994. Gates was devastated.

Bill and Melinda took some time off in 1995 to travel to several countries and get a new perspective on life and the world. In 1996, their first daughter, Jennifer, was born. A year later, Gates moved his family into a 55,000 square foot, $54 million house on the shore of Lake Washington. Though the house serves as a business center, it is said to be a very cozy home for the couple and their three children.

Philanthropic Efforts

With wife Melinda’s influence, Gates took an interest in filling his mother’s role as a civic leader. He began to realize that he had an obligation to give more of his wealth to charity. Being the consummate student he was, Gates studied the philanthropic work of Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller, titans of the American industrial revolution. In 1994, Gates and his wife established the William H. Gates Foundation which was dedicated to supporting education, world health, and investment in low-income communities. In 2000, the couple combined several family foundations to form the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. They started out by making a $28 billion contribution to set up the foundation.

Bill Gates stepped down from the day-to-day operations of Microsoft in 2000, turning over the job of CEO to college friend Steve Ballmer who had been with Microsoft since 1980. He positioned himself as chief software architect so he could concentrate on what was for him the more passionate side of the business. He still remains chairman of the board. Over the next few years, his involvement with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation occupied much of his time and even more of his interest. In 2006, Gates announced he was transitioning himself from full-time work at Microsoft, to devote more quality time to the Foundation. His last full day at Microsoft was June 27, 2008.

In addition to all the accolades of being one of the most successful and richest businessmen in the history of the world, Bill Gates has also received numerous awards for philanthropic work. Time magazine named Gates one of the most influential people of the 20th century. The magazine also named Gates, his wife Melinda, and rock band U2’s lead singer Bono as the 2005 Persons of the Year.

Gates also holds several honorary doctorates from universities throughout the world and an honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II. In 2006, Gates and his wife were awarded the Order of the Aztec Eagle by the Mexican government for their philanthropic work throughout the world in the areas of health and education.

In February 2014, Gates announced that he would be stepping down as chairman of Microsoft in order to move into a new position as technology adviser. In addition to Gates’s transition, it was reported that longtime Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer would be replaced by 46-year-old Satya Nadella.

Tom Hanks

Actor

Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American actor and filmmaker. Known for both his comedic and dramatic roles, Hanks is one of the most popular and recognizable film stars worldwide, and is regarded as an American cultural icon.[3] Hanks’s films have grossed more than $4.9 billion in North America and more than $9.96 billion worldwide,[4] making him the fourth-highest-grossing actor in North America.[5]

Hanks made his breakthrough with leading roles in the comedies Splash (1984) and Big (1988). He won two consecutive Academy Awards for Best Actor for starring as a gay lawyer suffering from AIDS in Philadelphia (1993) and a young man with below-average IQ in Forrest Gump (1994).[6] Hanks collaborated with film director Steven Spielberg on five films: Saving Private Ryan (1998), Catch Me If You Can (2002), The Terminal (2004), Bridge of Spies (2015), and The Post (2017), as well as the 2001 miniseries Band of Brothers, which launched him as a director, producer, and screenwriter. Hanks’s other notable films include the romantic comedies Sleepless in Seattle (1993) and You’ve Got Mail (1998); the dramas Apollo 13 (1995), The Green Mile (1999), Cast Away (2000), Road to Perdition (2002), and Cloud Atlas (2012); and the biographical dramas Charlie Wilson’s War (2007), Captain Phillips (2013), Saving Mr. Banks (2013), Sully (2016), and A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood (2019). He has also appeared as the title character in the Robert Langdon film series, and has voiced Sheriff Woody in the Toy Story film series (1995–2019).

Hanks’s accolades include two Academy Awards out of six nominations. Hanks has also won 7 Primetime Emmy Awards for his work as a producer of various limited series and television movies, including From the Earth to the MoonBand of BrothersJohn Adams, and The Pacific. In 2013, he received a Tony Award nomination for Best Actor in a Play for his performance in Nora Ephron‘s Lucky Guy. He has received the AFI Life Achievement Award in 2002. He received the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts in 2004.[7] In 2014, he received a Kennedy Center Honor, and in 2016, he received a Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama,[8] as well as the French Legion of Honor.[9] In 2020 he received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award.

 Norma Jean Baker (Marilyn Monroe)

(1926-1962)

7th Cousin 3x Removed

Movie Star

Cornell Line

Charles Stanley Gifford (1898-1965)Father of Norma Jean Baker (Marilyn Monroe)
Frederick Gifford (1865-1957)Father of Charles Stanley Gifford
Susan Bateman Almy (1841-1908)Mother of Frederick Gifford
Samuel Elam Almy (1800-1889)Father of Susan Bateman Almy
Cooke Almy (1765-1861)Father of Samuel Elam Almy
John Almy (1651-)Father of Cooke Almy
Elizabeth Cornell (1637-1714)Mother of John Almy
Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)Father of Rebecca Cornell
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

Famed Career

Monroe’s marriage to Dougherty fizzled out as she focused more on her career. The couple divorced in 1946—the same year that Monroe signed her first movie contract. With the movie contract came a new name and image; she began calling herself “Marilyn Monroe” and dyed her hair blonde. But her acting career didn’t really take off until the 1950s. Her small part in John Huston’s crime drama The Asphalt Jungle (1950) garnered her a lot of attention. That same year, she impressed audiences and critics alike with her performance as Claudia Caswell in All About Eve, starring Bette Davis. She would soon become one of Hollywood’s most , about Monroe’s relationship with Sir Laurence Olivier in 1957’s The Prince and the Showgirl.

She would soon become one of Hollywood’s most famous actresses; though she wasn’t initially considered to be star acting material, she later proved her skill by winning various honors and attracting large audiences to her films.

In 1953, Monroe made a star-making turn in Niagara, starring as a young married woman out to kill her husband with help from her lover. The emerging sex symbol was paired with another bombshell, Jane Russell, for the musical comedy Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953). The film was a hit and Monroe continued to find success in a string of light comedic fare, such as How to Marry a Millionaire with Betty Grable and Lauren Bacall, There’s No Business like Show Business (1954) with Ethel Merman and Donald O’Connor, andThe Seven Year Itch (1955).

“Being a sex symbol is a heavy load to carry, especially when one is tired, hurt and bewildered.”

With her breathy voice and hourglass figure, Monroe became a much-admired international star, despite her chronic insecurities regarding her acting abilities. Monroe suffered from pre-performance anxiety that sometimes made her physically ill and was often the root cause of her legendary tardiness on films sets, which was so extreme that it often infuriated her co-stars and crew. “She would be the greatest if she ran like a watch,” director Billy Wilder once said of her. “I have an aunt Minnie who’s very punctual, but who would pay to see Aunt Minnie?” Throughout her career, Monroe was signed and released from several contracts with film studios.

Tired of bubbly, dumb blonde roles, Monroe moved to New York City to study acting with Lee Strasberg at the Actors’ Studio. She returned to the screen in the dramatic comedy Bus Stop (1956), playing a saloon singer kidnapped by a rancher who has fallen in love with her. She received mostly praise for her performance.

In 1959, Monroe returned to familiar territory with the wildly popular comedySome Like It Hot, with Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis. She played Sugar Kane Kowalczyk, a singer who hopes to marry a millionaire in this humorous film, in which Lemmon and Curtis pretend to be women. They are on the run from the mob after witnessing the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre and hide out with an all-girl orchestra featuring Monroe. Her work on the film earned her the honor of “Best Actress in a Comedy” in 1959, at Golden Globe Awards.

Reunited with John Huston, Monroe starred opposite Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift in The Misfits (1961). Set in Nevada, this adventure drama features Monroe, who falls for Gable’s cowboy but battles him over the fate of some wild mustangs. This was her last completed film.

In 1962, Monroe was dismissed from Something’s Got to Give—also starring Dean Martin—for missing so many days of filming. According to an article in The New York Times, the actress claimed that the absences were due to illness. Martin declined to make the film without her, so the studio shelved the picture.

At the time, Monroe’s professional and personal life seemed to be in turmoil. Her last two films, Let’s Make Love (1960) and The Misfits (1961) were box office disappointments.

“A career is wonderful, but you can’t curl up with it on a cold night.”

In her personal life, she had a string of unsuccessful marriages and relationships. Her 1954 marriage to baseball great Joe DiMaggio only lasted nine months (she wed playwright Arthur Miller from 1956 to 1961).

On May 19, 1962, Monroe made her now-famous performance at John F. Kennedy’s birthday celebration, singing “Happy Birthday, Mr. President.”

Death and Legacy

On August 5, 1962, at only 36 years old, Marilyn Monroe died at her Los Angeles home. An empty bottle of sleeping pills was found by her bed. There has been some speculation over the years that she may have been murdered, but the cause of her death was officially ruled as a drug overdose. There have been rumors that Monroe was involved with President John F. Kennedy and/or his brother Robert around the time of her death.

Monroe was buried in her favorite Emilio Pucci dress, in what was known as a “Cadillac casket”—the most high-end casket available, made of heavy-gauge solid bronze and lined with champagne-colored silk. Lee Strasberg delivered a eulogy before a small group of friends and family. Hugh Hefner bought the crypt directly next to Monroe’s, and Monroe’s ex-husband, Joe DiMaggio, famously had red roses delivered to her crypt for the next 20 years.

“She was the victim of ballyhoo and sensation — exploited beyond anyone’s means.” — Sir Laurence Olivier

Monroe did not own a house until the last year of her life, and had surprisingly few possessions. One that she prized was an autographed photo of Albert Einstein, which included an inscription: “To Marilyn, with respect and love and thanks.”

During her career, Marilyn Monroe’s films grossed more than $200 million. Today, she is still considered the world’s most popular icon of sex appeal and beauty, and is remembered for her idiosyncratic sense of humor and sly wit; once asked by a reporter what she wore to bed, she replied, “Chanel Number 5.” On another occasion, she was asked what she thought of Hollywood. “If I close my eyes and think of Hollywood, all I see is one big varicose vein,” she replied. Monroe is also remembered for her romantic relationships with Marlon Brando, Frank Sinatra, Yves Montand and director Elia Kazan, in addition to her three marriages.

Monroe has been imitated over the years by a number of celebrities, including Madonna, Lady Gaga and Gwen Stefani. Actress Michelle Williams portrayed Monroe ina 2011 film, My Week with Marilyn, about Monroe’s relationship with Sir Laurence Olivier in 1957’s The Prince and the Showgirl.

In 2011, several rarely seen photos of Marilyn Monroe were published in a book of photographs by famed photographer Sam Shaw. August 5, 2012 marked the 50th anniversary of Monroe’s death. Now more than a half century later, the world is still fascinated by her beauty and talent. 

Milton Snavely Hershey

(1857-1945)

3rd Cousin 3x Removed

Hershey Chocolate Founder

Glosser / Wyatt  Line

Henry H. Hershey (1829-1904)Father of Milton Snavely Hershey
Jacob Franz Hershey (1802-1877)Father of Henry H. Hershey
Isaac Hernley Hershey (1773-1831)Father of Jacob Franz Hershey
Christian Hershey (1719-1782)Father of Isaac Hernley Hershey
Benjamin Hershey (1768-1842)Father of Christian Heshey
Catherine Hershey (1802-1875)Daughter of Benjamin Hershey
Nancy Ellen Wolford (1848-1912)Daughter of Catherine Hershey
Cora Belle Wyatt (1879-1926)Daughter of Nancy Ellen Wolford
Elmer Harrison Glosser (1902-1934)Son of Cora Belle Wyatt
Elmer Glosser Jr. (1929-2006)Son of Elmer Harrison Glosser
Eric E. GlosserSon of Elmer Glosser Jr.

 Milton Hershey was born on September 13, 1857, in Derry Township, Pennsylvania, although some sources say he was born in Derry Church, Pennsylvania. Following an incomplete rural school education, Hershey was apprenticed at age 15. After two failed attempts, Hershey set up the Lancaster Caramel Co. In 1900 Hershey sold the company, focused on perfecting the formula for chocolate bars, and began building at the site that became the world’s largest chocolate manufacturing plant.

Early Years

Entrepreneur Milton Snavely Hershey was born on September 13, 1857, in Derry Township, Pennsylvania. He was the only surviving child of Veronica “Fanny” Snavely and Henry Hershey. Born on a farm outside of Derry Church, Pennsylvania—a small farming community in the central part of the state—Hershey spent the early years of his childhood trailing his father, a dreamer who always had his eye out for the next big opportunity. But Henry Hershey lacked the perseverance and work ethic to stick anything out.

By 1867, Hershey’s father had largely cut himself out of the family picture. The details around his parents’ separation are cloudy, but it’s largely believed that Fanny, the daughter of a Mennonite clergyman, had grown tired of her husband’s failures.

With Hershey’s upbringing left to her, the strict Fanny instilled in her son an appreciation for hard work. At the age of 14, Hershey, who’d dropped out of school the year before, expressed an interest in candy making and began apprenticing with a master confectioner in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Four years later, Hershey borrowed $150 from his aunt and set up his own candy shop in the heart of Philadelphia.

Early Ventures

For five long years Hershey poured his sweat and time into the business. But success eluded him. Finally, he closed shop and headed west, reuniting with his father in Denver, where he found work with a confectioner. It was there that he discovered caramel and how fresh milk could be used to make it.

But the entrepreneur in Hershey wasn’t content to work for someone else, and he struck out on his own again, first in Chicago and later in New York City. In both cases, Hershey again failed. In 1883, he returned to Lancaster and, still convinced he could build a successful candy company, started the Lancaster Caramel Company.

Success soon followed. Within a few short years, Hershey had a thriving business and was shipping his caramels all over the country.

The Chocolate King

At the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, Hershey got an up-close look at the art of chocolate making. He was immediately hooked. While his caramel business boomed, Hershey started the Hershey Chocolate Company.

His fascination quickly became focused on milk chocolate, considered a delicacy and largely the domain of the Swiss. Hershey was determined to find a new formula that would allow him to mass-produce and mass-distribute milk chocolate candy.

In 1900 he sold the Lancaster Caramel Company for an astonishing $1 million. Three years later he began building a mammoth and modern candy-making facility in Derry Church. It opened in 1905, setting a new course for Hershey and the candy industry.

Man of the People

Quickly, the Hershey Chocolate Company’s success far exceeded that of its founder’s previous venture. His winning ideas included the Hershey Kiss in 1907, which the company’s founder named himself. The trademark foil wrapper was added in 1924.

As the company grew and Hershey’s wealth expanded, so did his vision for creating a model community in his home region. In the town that came to be known as Hershey, Pennsylvania, Hershey built schools, parks, churches, recreational facilities and housing for his employees. He even added a trolley system for his workers.

At his side for much of this philanthropy was his wife, Catherine, whom he’d married in 1898. Unable to have children of their own, the Hersheys focused a good portion of their giving on endeavors that affected kids. In 1909 the couple opened the Hershey Industrial School, a facility for orphaned boys. It has since become a landing spot for girls as well and is now known as the Milton Hershey School.

In 1918, three years after Catherine’s unexpected death, Hershey transferred much of his wealth, which included his ownership of the Hershey Chocolate Company, to the Hershey Trust, which funds the Hershey School.

Hershey’s philanthropy kept going even when the economy struggled and he was nearing the end of his life. In the 1930s, during the Great Depression, Hershey ignited a building mini-boom in his town in order to keep men working. He ordered the construction of a large hotel, a community building and new offices for the Hershey Company.

During World War II, Hershey backed the country’s military efforts by supplying forces with chocolate bars called the Ration D Bar and the better-tasting Tropical Chocolate Bar.

To those who knew Hershey, his generosity wasn’t surprising. Shy and reserved, Hershey’s quiet demeanor contrasted greatly with many of America’s other business titans. While he seldom wrote or read, and had been forced to leave school early, Hershey was driven to make sure those around him received a great education. His display of wealth was rather modest, if not downright thrifty. His house and the community he’d helped create meant everything to him. When it came to building his own home, he made sure the Hershey Company headquarters was part of the view.

Final Years

Following his wife Catherine’s death, Hershey never remarried and supposedly carried a picture of his late wife wherever he traveled. In keeping with the work ethic his mother instilled in him, Hershey continued to work well into his 80s. He died in Hershey, Pennsylvania, on October 13, 1945.

His legacy as a businessman and philanthropist continues to this day. The Hershey Chocolate Company has endured as one of the world’s great candy makers, with brands that include Almond Joy, Mounds, Cadbury, Reese’s and Twizzler.

Just as impressive, the Milton Hershey School now serves about 1,900 students each year, while the M.S. Hershey Foundation, which Hershey established in 1935, funds educational and cultural activities for Hershey residents.

 Ezra Cornell

(1807-1874)

1st Cousin 5x Removed

Founder of Cornell University

Cornell Line

Elijah Cornell Jr. (1771-1862)Father of Ezra Cornell
Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)Father of Elijah Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 He was born in Westchester Landing, in what would become the Bronx, New York, the son of Eunice (Barnard), and a potter, Elijah Cornell, and was raised nearDeRuyter, New York.[1] He was a cousin of Paul Cornell, the founder of Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. Cornell was also a distant relative of William Cornell, who was an early settler of Scarborough, Ontario whose name was used for the planned community of Cornell, Ontario. Having traveled extensively as a carpenter in New York State, Ezra, upon first setting eyes on Cayuga Lake and Ithaca, decided Ithaca would be his future home.

Ezra Cornell’s earliest American patrilineal ancestor, Thomas Cornell (settler) (1595-1673), was probably Puritan at first then a follower of Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson drifting into Quakerism which seems to have been the religion of his descendants.[2][3] [4] Portsmouth, RI is noteworthy in American history for the 1638Portsmouth Compact declaring for a separation of church and state rivaling the Flushing Remonstrance of 1657 declaring for religious tolerance in New Amsterdam, Quakers in particular.

After settling in at Ithaca, Cornell quickly went to work proving himself as a carpenter. Colonel Beebe took notice of the industrious young man and made him the manager of his mill at Fall Creek.

Ezra Cornell was a birthright Quaker, but was later disowned by the Society of Friends for marrying outside of the faith to a “world’s woman,” a Methodist by the name of Mary Ann Wood. Ezra and Mary Ann were married March 19, 1831, in Dryden, New York.

On February 24, 1832, Ezra Cornell wrote the following response to his expulsion from The Society of Friends due to his marriage to Mary Ann Wood:

I have always considered that choosing a companion for life was a very important affair and that my happiness or misery in this life depended on the choice…

The young and growing family needed more income than could be earned as manager of Beebe’s Mills. So, having purchased rights in a patent for a new type of plow, Ezra began what would be decades of traveling away from Ithaca. His territories for sales of the plow were the states of Maine and Georgia. His plan was to sell in Maine in the summer and the milder Georgia in the winter. With limited means, what transported Ezra between the two states were his own two feet.

Happening into the offices of the Maine Farmer in 1842, Cornell saw an acquaintance of his, one F.O.J. Smith, bent over some plans for a “scraper” as Smith called it. For services rendered, Smith had been granted a one-quarter share of the telegraph patent held by Samuel F.B. Morse, and was attempting to devise a way of burying the telegraph lines in the ground in lead pipe.[5] Ezra’s knowledge of plows was put to the test and Ezra devised a special kind of plow that would dig a 2½ foot ditch, lay the pipe and telegraph wire in the ditch and cover it back up as it went. Later it was found that condensation in the pipes and poor insulationof the wires impeded the electrical current on the wires and so hanging the wire from telegraph poles became the accepted method.

Cornell made his fortune in the telegraph business as an associate of Samuel Morse, having gained his trust by constructing and stringing the telegraph poles between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland, as the first ever telegraph line of substance in the U.S. To address the problem of telegraph lines shorting out to the ground, Cornell invented the idea of using glass insulators at the point where telegraph lines are connected to supporting poles. After joining with Morse, Cornell supervised the erection of many telegraph lines, including a portion of the New York, Albany & Buffalo line in 1846 and the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company connecting Buffalo to Milwaukee with partners John James Speed and Francis Ormand Jonathan Smith. Cornell, Speed and Smith also built the New York and Erie line competing with and paralleling to the south the New York, Albany and Buffalo line in which Morse had a major share.[6] The line was completed in 1849 and Cornell was made president of the company.
Cornell’s sister Phoebe married Martin B. Wood and moved to Albion, Michigan, in 1848. Cornell gave Wood a job constructing new lines and made Phoebe his telegraph operator, the first woman operator in the United States.[7]
Cornell earned a substantial fortune when the Erie and Michigan was consolidated with Hiram Sibley and his New York and Mississippi Company to form the Western Union company.[8] Cornell received two million in Western Union stock.[9]

Cornell was a Republican member of the New York State Assembly (Tompkins Co.) in 1862 and 1863; and of the New York State Senate from 1864 to 1867, sitting in the 87th88th89th and 90th New York State Legislatures.

Cornell retired from Western Union and turned his attention to philanthropy. He endowed the Cornell Library, a public library for the citizens of Ithaca. A lifelong enthusiast of science and agriculture, he saw great opportunity in the 1862 Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act to found a university that would teach practical subjects on an equal basis with the classics favored by more traditional institutions. Andrew Dickson Whitehelped secure the new institution’s status as New York’s land grant university, and Cornell University was granted a charter through their efforts in 1865. Ezra Cornell entered the railroad business, but fared poorly due to the Panic of 1873. He began construction of a palatial Ithaca mansion, Llenroc (Cornell spelled in reverse) to replace his farmhouse, Forest Home, but died before it was completed. Llenroc was maintained by Cornell’s heirs for several decades until being sold to the local chapter of the Delta Phi fraternity, which occupies it to this day; Forest Home was sold to the Delta Tau Delta chapter and later demolished. Cornell is interred in Sage Chapel on Cornell’scampus, along with Daniel Willard Fiske and Jennie McGraw. Cornell was originally laid to rest in Lake View Cemetery, Ithaca N.Y., then moved to Sage Chapel.

A prolific letter writer, Ezra corresponded with a great many people and would write dozens of letters each week. This was due partly to his wide traveling, and also to the many business associates he maintained during his years as an entrepreneur and later as a politician and university founder. Cornell University has made the approximately 30,000 letters in the Cornell Correspondenceavailable online.

His eldest son, Alonzo B. Cornell, was later governor of New York. Since its founding, the University’s charter specified that the eldest lineal descendent of Cornell is granted a life seat on Cornell University’s Board of Trustees,[10] currently Ezra Cornell IV. (Since Ezra Cornell IV took the post on November 17, 1969,[11] the law was amended, not now specifying the “eldest male lineal descendant.”)

In 1990, G. David Low, graduate of Cornell University and Space Shuttle astronaut, took with him into outer space a pair of tan silk socks worn by Ezra Cornell on his wedding day in 1831

 Alonzo Barton Cornell

(1832-1904)

2nd Cousin 4x Removed

Governor of New York 1880

Cornell Line

Ezra Cornell (1807-1874)Father of Alonzo Barton Cornell
Elijah Cornell Jr. (1771-1862)Father of Ezra Cornell
Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)Father of Elijah Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 ALONZO B. CORNELL, the thirtieth governor of New York, was born in Ithaca, New York on January 22, 1832. His education was attained at Ithaca Academy. As a teenager, he worked as a telegraph operator, and eventually became the vice president and director of the Western Union Telegraph Company. He also was a successful steamboat owner and banker. Cornell first entered politics as an unsuccessful candidate for the lieutenant governorship in the 1868 election. From 1870 to 1878 he chaired the New York Republican State Central Committee; and in 1873 he served as a member and speaker of the New York House of Representatives. He also served as the surveyor of customs in New York City, a post he held from 1876 to 1878. Cornell next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote on November 4, 1879. During his tenure, a women’s reformatory in Hudson was organized; a state railroad commission was initiated; a state board of health was formed; women qualified for positions as school officers; and a corporation state tax law was sanctioned. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Cornell retired from political life. Governor Alonzo B. Cornell passed away on October 15, 1904, and was buried in the Sage Chapel at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978,Vol. 3, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

 Daniel Robert Graham

(1936-)

9th Cousin 1x Removed

Governor of Florida from 1979 to 1987, US Senator from Florida from 1987 to Present

Cornell Line

Hildah Elizabeth Simmons (1906-1976)Mother of Daniel Robert Graham
Mary Ansley (1866-1940)Mother of Hildah Elizabeth Simmons
Samuel Joseph Ansley (1839-1932)Father of Mary Ansley
John Thomas Ansley (1808-1891)Father of Samuel Joseph Ansley
Ann Morris (1772-1838)Mother of John Thomas Ansley
Job Morris (1711-1767)Father of Ann Morris
Richard Morris (1682-1741)Father of Job Morris
Elizabeth Almy (1663-1711)Mother of Richard Morris
Elizabeth Cornell (1637-1714)Mother of Elizabeth Almy
Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)Father of Elizabeth Cornell
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 Senator from Florida; born in Coral Gables, Fla., November 9, 1936; attended the public schools of Dade County, Fla.; graduated, University of Florida, Gainesville 1959; graduated, Harvard Law School 1962; admitted to the Florida bar in 1962; builder and cattleman; elected to the Florida State house of representatives 1966; member, Florida State senate 1970-1978; governor of Florida 1979-1986; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1986; reelected in 1992 and 1998 and served from January 3, 1987, to January 3, 2005; chair, Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (One Hundred Third Congress), Select Committee on Intelligence (One Hundred Seventh Congress [January 3-20, 2001; June 6, 2001-January 3, 2003]); was not a candidate for reelection to the Senate in 2004; was an unsuccessful candidate for Democratic nomination for president in 2004.

 Elizabeth A. “Lizzie” Borden

(1860-1927)

6th Cousin 3x Removed

Infamous Murder Suspect

Cornell Line

Andrew Jackson Borden (1822-1892)Father of Lizzie Borden
Abraham Bowen Borden (1798-1882)Father of Andrew Jackson Borden
Richard Borden Jr. (1748-1824)Father of Abraham Bowen Borden
Richard Borden Sr. (1722-1795)Father of Richard Borden Jr.
Thomas Borden (1697-1740)Father of Richard Borden Sr.
Innocent Cornell (1673-1720)Mother of Thomas Borden
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Father of Innocent Cornell
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of  Mary Alice Cornell

Lizzie was born in, and lived in, Fall River, Massachusetts. Her father was Andrew Borden, and her mother, Sarah, died when Lizzie was less than three years old. Lizzie had another sister, Emma, who was nine years older. Another daughter, between Emma and Lizzie, died in infancy.

Andrew Borden remarried in 1865. His second wife, Abby Durfree Gray, and the two sisters, Lizzie and Emma, lived mostly quietly and uneventfully, until 1892. Lizzie was active at church, including teaching Sunday School and membership in the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). In 1890, she traveled abroad briefly with some friends. 

Lizzie Borden’s father had become comfortably wealthy, and was known as tight with his money. The house, while not small, had no modern plumbing. In 1884 when Andrew gave his wife’s half-sister a house, his daughters objected and fought with their stepmother, refusing thereafter to call her “mother” and calling her simply “Mrs. Borden” instead. Andrew tried to make peace with his daughters, in 1887 giving them some funds and allowing them to rent out his old family home. In 1891, tensions in the family were strong enough that, after some apparent thefts from the master bedroom, each of the Bordens bought locks for their bedrooms.

In July of 1892, Lizzie and her sister Emma went to visit some friends; Lizzie returned and Emma remained away. In early August, Andrew and Abby Borden were struck with an attack of vomiting, and Mrs. Borden told someone that she suspected poison. The brother of Lizzie’s mother came to stay at the house, and on August 4, this brother and Andrew Borden went into town together. Andrew returned alone and lay down in the sitting room.

Killings

The maid, who had earlier been ironing and washing windows, was taking a nap when Lizzie called to her to come downstairs — Lizzie said that her father had been killed while she (Lizzie) went to the barn. He had been hacked in the face and head with an axe or hatchet. After a doctor was called, Abby was found, also dead, in a bedroom, also hacked many times (the later investigation said twenty times, not forty as in the children’s rhyme) with an axe or hatchet.

Later tests showed that Abby had died 1-2 hours before Andrew; because Andrew died without a will, this meant that his estate, worth about $300,000 to $500,000, would go to his daughters, and not to Abby’s heirs.

Lizzie Borden was arrested.

Trial of Lizzie Borden

Evidence included a report that she’d tried to burn a dress a week after the murder (a friend testified it had been stained with paint), and reports that she had tried to buy a poison just before the murders. The murder weapon was never found for certain — a hatchet head that may have been washed and deliberately made to look dirty was found in the cellar — nor any blood-stained clothes.

Lizzie Borden’s trial began June 3, 1893. It was widely covered by the press locally and nationally. Some Massachusetts feminists wrote in Borden’s favor. Townspeople split into two camps. Borden did not testify, having told the inquest that she had been searching the barn for fishing equipment and then eating pears outside during the time of the murders. She said “I am innocent. I leave it to my counsel to speak for me.”

Without direct evidence of Lizzie Borden’s part in the murder, the jury was not convinced of her guilt. Lizzie Borden was acquitted on June 20, 1893.

After the Trial

She remained in Fall River, buying a new and bigger home she called “Maplecroft,” and calling herself Lizbeth instead of Lizzie. She lived with her sister Emma until they had a falling-out in 1904 or 1905, possibly over Emma’s displeasure at Lizzie’s friends from the New York theater crowd. Both Lizzie and Emma also took in many pets, and left part of their estates to the Animal Rescue League.

Lizzie Borden died at Fall River, Massachusetts, in 1927, her legend as a murderess still strong. She was buried next to her father and stepmother. The home in which the murders took place opened as a bed-and-breakfast in 1992.

Brittany Grace Lincicome 

LPGA Professional Golfer

Brittany Grace Lincicome1985-

5th cousin

Glosser / Weekley Line

5’9”…Started playing golf at the age of 9…Credits her parents and two brothers, Hunter and Bryan Vickers, as the individuals most influencing her career…Hobbies include fishing and playing Texas Hold’em…Qualified for the Tour on her first attempt…Has her own Web site, www.brittany1golf.com.

LPGA Tour Victories (8)

  • 2018 Pure Silk Bahamas LPGA Classic 
  • 2017 Pure Silk Bahamas LPGA Classic
  • 2015 ANA Inspiration
  • 2011 ShopRite LPGA Classic, CN Canadian Women’s Open
  • 2009 Kraft Nabisco Championship 
  • 2007 Ginn Open
  • 2006 HSBC Women’s World Match Play Championship

The Solheim Cup (6)

  • 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015, 2017

2019 in a Nutshell

  • Seven events, five cuts made, $59,023 (131)
  • Crossed the $9 million mark in career earnings after a season-best T22 finish at the Diamond Resorts Tournament of Champions presented by Insurance Office of America before taking maternity leave in May 2019

Career Highlights:

2018:

  • 21 events, 19 cuts made, $833,586 (22)
  • Earned her eighth career LPGA victory at the Pure Silk-Bahamas LPGA Classic, one of seven top-10 finishes
  • Became the sixth female in history to compete in a PGA TOUR event as a sponsor exemption at the Barbasol Championship

2017:

  • 24 events, 20 cuts made, $579,061 (32)
  • Earned her seventh career LPGA victory at the Pure Silk-Bahamas LPGA Classic, one of her three top-10 finishes
  • Crossed the $8 million mark in career earnings with a T8 finish at the Marathon Classic presented by Owens Corning & O-I
  • Competed on her sixth U.S. Solheim Cup Team and recorded a 2-1-0

2016:

  • 25 events, 23 cuts made, $390,170 (47)
  • Recorded a career best in sand saves (58.1%) which ranked fifth on Tour

2015:

  • 26 events, 23 cuts made, $933,521 (12)
  • Won her second-career major at the ANA Inspiration and earned four additional top-10 finishes on the season
  • Competed for the winning U.S. Solheim Cup team

2014:

  • 26 events, 21 cuts made, $790,661 (17)
  • Six Top-10 finishes
  • Season-best finish was a solo second at Wegmans LPGA Championship (lost to Inbee Park in a playoff)
  • Led the Tour in average driving distance (271.462)

2013:

  • 23 events, 16 cuts made, $449,113 (32)
  • 3 top-10 finishes including a season-best tie for third at the CN Canadian Women’s Open
  • Finished second on Tour in eagles (12) and sixth in driving distance (266.8)
  • Competed on her fourth U.S. Solheim cup Team and posted a 5-7-2 record

2012:

  • 24 events, 21 cuts made, $581,631 (23)
  • Six top-10 finishes; including season-best runner-up finishes at the ISPS Handa Women’s Australian Open and the Safeway Classic Presented by Coca-Cola.
  • Led the Tour in driving distance with a 276 average.

2011:

  • Recorded her fourth and fifth LPGA victories this season at the CN Canadian Women’s Open and the ShopRite LPGA Classic. 
  • Additional top-10 finishes included: tied for second at the RR Donnelley LPGA Founders Cup; tied for third at the LPGA State Farm Classic and the LPGA HanaBank Championship; tied for 10th at the Walmart NW Arkansas Championship. 
  • Competed on her third U.S. Solheim Cup Team with a 2-2-1 record.

2010: 

  • Best finish was runner-up at the Navistar LPGA Classic Presented by Monaco RV. 
  • Tied for second at the Bell Micro LPGA Classic. 
  • Tied for fifth at the Mizuno Classic. 
  • Tied for eighth at the CVS/pharmacy LPGA Challenge. 
  • Finished T9 at the Tres Marias Championship and the RICOH Women’s British Open.

2009: 

  • Eagled the 72nd hole to win the Kraft Nabisco Championship, the first major championship of the LPGA Tour season, which was her third career LPGA win and first major championship victory. 
  • Crossed the $2 million mark in career earnings. 
  • Posted a fifth-place finish at the U.S. Women’s Open. 
  • Carded a career-low 64 in the opening round of the Sybase Classic Presented by ShopRite, where she tied for sixth. 
  • Tied for 10th at the Wegmans LPGA and tied for 11th at the Samsung World Championship. 
  • Qualified for her second U.S. Solheim Cup Team appearance by finishing ninth on the points list; posted 2-2-0 record for the victorious team.

2008

  • Best finish was a tie for seventh at the Jamie Farr Owens Corning Classic Presented by Kroger. 

2007:

  • Came from four strokes back to earn her second career LPGA victory at the Ginn OPEN. 
  • Recorded a tie for second at the Kraft Nabisco Championship, one of three additional top-10 finishes of the season. 
  • Recorded top-20 finishes in all four major championships. 
  • Crossed the $1 million mark in career earnings at the Safeway International Presented by Coca-Cola. 
  • Was one of four rookies on the victorious U.S. Solheim Cup Team.

2006: 

  • Became a Rolex First-Time Winner after winning six consecutive matches as the 39th seed at the HSBC Women’s World Match Play Championship.

2005: 

  • Recorded a season-best finish at the ShopRite LPGA Classic, where she tied for 18th. 
  • Led the Tour with a 270.3 yard driving-distance average.

2004: 

  • Turned professional in December; tied for 20th at the LPGA Final Qualifying Tournament to earn exempt status for the 2005 LPGA season.

Amateur:

  • Lincicome had a stellar amateur career that began with a tournament win at age 9. 
  • She participated in more than 100 amateur events, winning 60 percent of the time. 
  • Lincicome was a star on the American Junior Golf Association (AJGA) circuit, winning three events. 
  • In 2004, she won the Harder Hall Invitational and advanced to the round of 16 at the U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship. 
  • Lincicome competed in the 2004 U.S. Women’s Open and led after the first round before finishing 55th. 
  • She also played in the State Farm Classic in 2004 as an amateur, finishing in a tie for 66th. 

Personal:

  • 5’9”
  • Started playing golf at the age of 9.
  • Credits her parents and two brothers, Hunter and Bryan Vickers, as the individuals most influencing her career.
  • Hobbies include fishing and playing Texas Hold’em.
  • Qualified for the Tour on her first attempt.
  • Has her own Web site, www.brittany1golf.com.

 Thomas Cornell Jr.

(1627-1673)

8th Great Grandfather

Hanged for Murder on Spectral Evidence

Cornell Line

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 Thomas Cornell was one of the earliest settlers of Rhode Island and the Bronx and a contemporary of Roger Williams and the family of Anne Hutchinson. He is the ancestor of a number of Americans prominent in business, politics, and education.

Thomas Cornell born about 1595 in Essex, England and died in Portsmouth, RI in 1655. He married Rebecca Briggs, born in 1600, in about 1620. Their eldest son also named Thomas Cornell (Jr.) was born October, 1627 in Saffron Walden, Essex, England. Thomas Cornell and his family immigrated from England to Boston in 1638 when their eldest son Thomas Cornell (Jr.) would have been age 11.

Thomas Cornell was an innkeeper in Boston who was part of the Peripheral Group in the Antinomian Controversy, a religious and political conflict in the Massachusetts Bay Colony from 1636 to 1638.[1] Cornell sold his inn in 1643 and left for Rhode Island, where others from the Antinomian Controversy had settled in 1638 after being ordered to leave the Massachusetts Bay Colony.[2]

Cornell became friends with Roger Williams and co-founded the village of Westchester north of New Amsterdam (later New York City) in 1643. He returned to Rhode Island in 1644 and obtained a land grant for 100 acres in Portsmouth, RI on Aquidneck Island that became the Cornell homestead. His neighbor was Edward Hutchison, a son of Anne Hutchison from the Antinomian Controversy.[2]

In 1646, Cornell was granted a patent on an area of about four square miles that later became part of the Bronx. It was bounded by Westchester Creek, Bronx River, village of Westchester and East River and was called Cornell’s Neck. The area is now known as Clason Point.[2]

Controversial Murder Trial of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Thomas’ son Thomas Cornell (Jr.) was accused, tried, convicted and hanged for the alleged murder of his mother, Rebecca Briggs Cornell, in Portsmouth in 1673. He was convicted using circumstantial evidence as well as spectral evidence, where witnesses recounted dreams involving ghosts pointing to his alleged guilt. American jurisprudence was later modernized to exclude the use of apparitions and dreams as evidence in trials. This case and its history has been chronicled in the book Killed Strangely: The Death of Rebecca Cornell by Elaine Forman Crane.[3][4]

Compliments of Wikipedia

 Thomas C. Cornell

(1814-1860)

6th Cousin 4x Removed

United States House of Representatives from New York (1867-1869) & (1881-1883)

Cornell Line

Peter Cornell (1780-1860)Father of Thomas C. Cornell
Thomas Cornell (1754-1817)Father of Peter Cornell
Peter Cornell (1732-1767)Father of Thomas Cornell
Richard Cornell Jr. (1708-1758)Father of Peter Cornell
Richard Cornell Sr. (1678-1757)Father of Richard Cornell Jr.
John Cornell (1634-1694)Father of Richard Cornell Sr.
Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)Father of John Cornell
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

He was born in White Plains, New York on January 27, 1814 to Peter Cornell (1780–1860) and Margaret Gedney (1786–1829). After attending public schools, Thomas C. Cornell was drawn to Rondout, N.Y. by his uncle, Thomas W. Cornell, Peter’s brother. Thomas W. came to the Rondout area in 1822 and opened a general store in New Salem. When the Delaware and Hudson canal opened in 1828 his business grew rapidly.

In the 1830s Thomas C. Cornell worked for David P. Mapes of Coxsackie, NY. Mapes’ enterprises foreshadowed Cornell’s business success. Mapes owned the sidewheelerGeneral Jackson which had the contract to haul barges for the D&H Canal Company and he also owned a stage line running from Rondout into the Catskills.

In 1837 with his own sloop, Cornell started what was to become the Cornell Seamboat Company. In 1850 he obtained the contract for towing D&H Canal Company barges. Following the Civil War the Cornell Steamboat Line virtually monopolized freight traffic on the Hudson River, dominating the towing of barges well into the 1900s. While the Steamboat Company was the heart of his empire, Cornell engaged in many other related enterprises.

In 1866 he incorporated what was to become the Ulster and Delaware Railroad (U&D). He was involved in the construction and operation of several other railroads including the Wallkill Valley and the Rhinebeck and Connecticut Railroad.

In 1868, along with other business leaders in Rondout, he founded the Rondout Savings Bank. He is also reported to have been a founder of a commercial bank.

Cornell at one time owned the Grand Hotel, a luxurious hotel set on the border between Ulster and Delaware counties. The Grand Hotel had its own station, Grand Hotel Station (today known as Highmount) on theUlster and Delaware Railroad.

He died in Kingston, New York on March 30, 1890 and was interred at the Montrepose Cemetery

Courtesy of Wikipedia 

 Katharine Cornell 

(The First Lady of Theatre)

Cornell Line

Katherine Cornell Actress 1893-1974
8th cousin 2x removed

Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974) was an American stage actress, writer, theater owner and producer. She was born to American parents and raised in Buffalo, New York.

Cornell is known as the greatest American stage actress of the 20th century. She was nicknamed “First Lady of the Theatre,” a title also bestowed upon her friend Helen Hayes, though each deferred to the other. Nonetheless, her contributions to acting and to the theater are unparalleled. Cornell is noted for her major Broadway roles in serious dramas, often directed by her husband, Guthrie McClintic. Together, they formed a production company, which gave them complete artistic freedom in choosing and producing plays. Their production company gave first or prominent Broadway roles to some of the greatest actors of the 20th century, including many of the great British Shakespearean actors. In addition, the strength of her acting and the quality of the productions brought popular success to such authors as George Bernard Shaw and William Shakespeare, who until then were not often performed, thereby paving the way for their eventual popularity throughout the country for the rest of the century and beyond.

John Alsop Jr.

(1724-1794)

1st Cousin of Wife of 3rd Cousin 7x Removed

Delegate for the New York Continental Congress During the Revolutionary War

Cornell Line

Abigail Sackett (1695-1751)Mother of John Alsop Jr.
Joseph Sackett Sr. (1656-1719)Father of Abigail Sackett
Joseph Sacket Jr. (1680-1755)Son of Joseph Sackett Sr.
Frances Sackett (1720-1754)Daughter of Joseph Sackett Jr.
Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr. (1717-1780)Husband of Frances Sackett
Mary Hallett (1687-1743)Mother of Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr.
Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)Mother of Mary Hallett
Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)Mother of Sarah Woosley
Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)Father of Rebecca Cornell
Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.
Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.
Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.
Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)Son of Elijah Cornell
John Cornell (1788-1860)Son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)Son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)Son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)Son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)Daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric E. GlosserSon of Mary Alice Cornell

 ALSOP, John, a Delegate from New York; born in New Windsor, Orange County, N.Y., in 1724; completed preparatory studies; moved to New York City and engaged in mercantile pursuits and importing; represented New York City in the colonial legislature; one of the incorporators of the New York Hospital, serving as its governor 1770-1784; Member of the Continental Congress 1774-1776; member of a committee of one hundred appointed in 1775 by the citizens of the city to take charge of the government until a convention could be assembled; served as the eighth president of the New York Chamber of Commerce in 1784 and 1785; died in Newtown, Long Island, N.Y., November 22, 1794; interment in Trinity Church Cemetery, New York City.

Charlemagne King of Franks

742–814

BIRTH 2 APR 742 • Herstal, Wallonia, Belgium

DEATH 28 JUN 814 • Aachen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

38th great-grandfather

 24th Great Uncle

Cornell Line

John Lackland King of England (1167 – 1216)father of Richard Cornwall King of Romans
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)
son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 Richard of Cornwall (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272), second son of King John, was Count of Poitou (1225-1243), 1st Earl of Cornwall (from 1225) and German King (formally “King of the Romans“) (from 1257). He was one of the wealthiest men in Europe and joined the Barons’ Crusade, where he achieved success as a negotiator for the release of prisoners and assisted with the building of the citadel in Ascalon.

He was born 5 January 1209 at Winchester Castle, the second son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême. He was made High Sheriff of Berkshire at the age of only eight, was styled Count of Poitou from 1225 and in the same year, at the age of sixteen, his brother King Henry III gave him Cornwall as a birthday present, making himHigh Sheriff of Cornwall. Richard’s revenues from Cornwall provided him with great wealth, and he became one of the wealthiest men in Europe. Though he campaigned on King Henry’s behalf in Poitou and Brittany, and served as regent three times, relations were often strained between the brothers in the early years of Henry’s reign. Richard rebelled against him three times, and had to be bought off with lavish gifts.

Marriage to Isabel, 1231–40[edit]

In March 1231 he married Isabel Marshal, the wealthy widow of the Earl of Gloucester, much to the displeasure of his brother King Henry, who feared the Marshal family because they were rich, influential, and often opposed to him. Richard became stepfather to Isabel’s six children from her first husband. In that same year he acquired his main residence, Wallingford Castle in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire), and spent much money on developing it. He had other favoured properties at Marlow and Cippenhamin Buckinghamshire. Isabel and Richard had four children, of whom only their son, Henry of Almain, survived to adulthood. Richard opposed Simon de Montfort, and rose in rebellion in 1238 to protest against the marriage of his sister, Eleanor, to Simon. Once again he was placated with rich gifts. When Isabel was on her deathbed in 1240, she asked to be buried next to her first husband at Tewkesbury, but Richard had her interred at Beaulieu Abbey instead. As a pious gesture, however, he sent her heart to Tewkesbury.

On Crusade and marriage to Sanchia, 1240–43[edit]

Later that year Richard departed for the Holy Land. He fought no battles but managed to negotiate for the release of prisoners and the burials of Crusaders killed at a battle in Gaza in 1239. He also refortified Ascalon, which had been demolished by Saladin. On his return from the Holy Land, Richard visited his sister Isabella, the empress of Frederick II.

After the birth of prince Edward in 1239, provisions were made in case of the king’s death, which favoured the Queen and her Savoyard relatives and excluded Richard. To keep him from becoming discontented King Henry and Queen Eleanor brought up the idea of a marriage with Eleanor’s sister Sanchia shortly after his return on 28 January 1242.[citation needed] On his journey to the Holy Land, Richard had met her in Provence, where he was warmly welcomed by her father Raymond Berenger IV and had fallen in love with this beautiful girl.[2] Richard and Sanchia (whom the English called Cynthia) married at Westminster in November 1243.

This marriage tied him closely to the royal party. Eleanor and Sanchia’s youngest sister Beatrice would marry Charles I of Naples, while their oldest sister Margaret had married Louis IX of France. The marriages of the kings of France and England, and their two brothers to the four sisters fromProvence improved the relationship between the two countries, which led up to the Treaty of Paris.[3]

Poitou and Sicily[edit]

Richard’s claims to Gascony and Poitou were never more than nominal, and in 1241 King Louis IX of France invested his own brother Alphonse with Poitou. Moreover, Richard and Henry’s mother, Isabella of Angoulême, claimed to have been insulted by the French queen. They were encouraged to recover Poitou by their stepfather, Hugh X of Lusignan, but the expedition turned into a military fiasco after Lusignan betrayed them.[4]

The pope offered Richard the crown of Sicily, but according to Matthew Paris he responded to the extortionate price by saying, “You might as well say, ‘I make you a present of the moon – step up to the sky and take it down’.”[5] Instead, his brother King Henry purchased the kingdom for his own son Edmund.

Although Richard was elected in 1256 as King of Germany by four of the seven German Electoral Princes (CologneMainz, the Palatinate and Bohemia), his candidacy was opposed by Alfonso X of Castile who was elected by Saxony, Brandenburg and Trier. The pope and king Louis IX of France favoured Alfonso, but both were ultimately convinced by the powerful relatives of Richard’s sister-in-law, Eleanor of Provence, to support Richard. Ottokar II of Bohemia, who at first voted for Richard but later elected Alfonso, eventually agreed to support the earl of Cornwall, thus establishing the required simple majority. So Richard had to bribe only four of them, but this came at a huge cost of 28,000 marks. On 27 May 1257 the archbishop of Cologne himself crowned Richard “King of the Romans” in Aachen;[6] however, like his lordships in Gascony and Poitou, his title never held much significance, and he made only four brief visits to Germany between 1257 and 1269.

Richard of Cornwall married thrice:

Firstly, on 30 March 1231 at Fawley, Buckinghamshire, to Isabel Marshal, daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (by his wife Isabel FitzGilbert) and widow ofGilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Gloucester. Isabel died in child-birth at Berkhamsted Castle on 17 January 1240, and was buried at Beaulieu Abbey. By Isabel he had three sons and a daughter:[7]

John of Cornwall (31 January 1232 – 22 September 1232), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey.

Isabel of Cornwall (c. 9 September 1233 – 6 October 1234), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey.

Henry of Cornwall (2 November 1235 – 13 March 1271) Henry of Almain, murdered by his cousins Guy and Simon de Montfort, buried at Hailes Abbey.

Nicholas of Cornwall (b. & d. 17 January 1240 at Berkhamsted Castle), died shortly after birth, buried at Beaulieu Abbey with his mother.

Secondly he married, on 23 November 1243 at Westminster AbbeySanchia of Provence (c.1225 – 9 November 1261), daughter of Raymond, Count of Provence by his wifeBeatrice of Savoy, by whom he had two sons:[8]

unnamed son, (born July 1246, died 15 August 1246).

Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall (c. 1 January 1250 – c. 25 September 1300), usually styled Edmund of Almain, who married Margaret de Clare (born 1250, died shortly before November 1312), daughter of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, by his second wife, Maud de Lacy, daughter of John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln. They had no issue, and the marriage was dissolved in February 1294.

Thirdly he married, on 16 June 1269 at KaiserslauternBeatrice of Falkenburg, daughter of Dietrich I, Count of Falkenburg. They had no issue.[9] She was about sixteen years of age at the time of the marriage, and was said to be one of the most beautiful women of her time.[citation needed] Beatrice died 17 October 1277, and was buried before the high altar at the Church of the Grey Friars in Oxford.[10]

Mistress & illegitimate progeny[edit]

Joan de Valletort[edit]

Richard, Earl of Cornwall had a mistress, Joan, of unknown origins,[11] wife successively of Ralph de Valletort (d. 1267),[12] feudal baron of Harberton,[13] Devon, and feudal baron of Trematon, Cornwall, and Sir Alexander Okeston of Modbury, Devon.[14] Richard, Earl of Cornwall, had the following progeny by his mistress Joan de Valletort, three sons and two daughters:[15]

Philip of Cornwall, a priest.

Sir Richard of Cornwall, who received a grant from his half-brother Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall, (d. 1300) in which he was called “brother”. He married Joan FitzAlan, daughter of John FitzAlan, 6th Earl of Arundel, and by her had three sons and a daughter. He was slain by an arrow at the Siege of Berwick in 1296. His daughter, Joan of Cornwall, married Sir John Howard, from whom the Howard familyDukes of Norfolk, are descended.[16]

Heraldic escutcheon from mural monument in Branscombe Church, Devon, to Joan Tregarthin (died 1583), wife of John Wadham (died 1578). Her descent from Richard, Earl of Cornwall is referred to in the inscription and the arms of his descendants, the de Cornwall family of Brannel, are shown in the 4th quarter of the sinister half of the escutcheon: lion rampant in chief a label of three points a bordure engrailed bezantée. The appearance of bezantée charges is a reference to the arms of the Duchy of Cornwall (Sable, fifteen bezants 5,4,3,2,1)

Sir Walter of Cornwall, who received a grant of the royal manor of Brannel,[17] Cornwall, from his half-brother Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall (d. 1300) in which he was called “brother”. He was the father of William de Cornwall and grandfather of John de Cornwall who married Margery Tregago, parents of Margaret de Cornwall who married David Hendower, from whom was descended Joan Tregarthin (d. 1583), wife of John Wadham (d.1578) of Edge, Branscombe.[18] The mural monument of Joan Tregarthin (d. 1583) in Branscombe Church, Devon, has an inscription referring to her as “a virtuous & antient gentlewoman descended of the antient house of Plantagenets sometime of Cornwall” and shows the arms of Tregarthin quartering the arms of the de Cornwall family of BrannelA lion rampant in chief a label of three points a bordure engrailed bezantée.

Isabel of Cornwall, who received a grant from King Henry III in which she was called “niece”.

Joan of Cornwall, (alias Joan Okeston, legally the daughter and heiress of Sir Alexander Okeston of Modbury, Devon)[19] who in 1283 received a grant from her half-brotherEdmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall (d.1300) in which she was called “sister”.[20] Modbury was part of the Valletorts’ feudal barony of Harberton and was granted to Sir Alexander Okeston, following his marriage to the Earl of Cornwall’s mistress, Joan, widow of Ralph de Valletort, by Roger de Valletort, Ralph’s brother.[21] She married twice, firstly to Richard de Champernowne (2nd son of Sir Henry Champernowne of Clyst Champernowne, Devon), by whom she had a son, Sir Richard de Champernowne, and secondly, Sir Peter de Fishacre, of Combe Fishacre and Coleton Fishacre, Devon,[22] by whom she had no issue. Following the death of her childless brother Sir James Okeston, the manor of Modbury was conveyed by order of Edward II (1307–27, great-nephew of Richard, Earl of Cornwall), to his sister’s grandson Sir Richard de Champernowne.

 King John (King of England)

 John Lackland

Father of Richard Plantagenet

My: 24th Great Grandfather

Cornell Line

Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)
son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

King John of England
The following biography information provides basic facts and information about the life of King John King of England:

Nationality: English

Also Known by the Nickname: Lackland. John, King Henry II youngest son, had been called Lackland, because he had nothing when his brothers each had some great dukedom

Lifespan: 1167 – 1216

Reigned as King of England: April 6, 1199 – October 19,1216. His Coronation was on May 27, 1199 

Date of Birth: King John was born on December 24, 1167 at Beaumont Palace, Oxford

Family connections / Genealogy: He was the son of King Henry II (1133–1189) and Eleanor of Aquitaine (1124–1204). He succeeded his brother, Richard the Lionheart to the throne of England

Date succeeded to the throne of England: April 6, 1199 . His Coronation was on May 27, 1199

Married: John was married to Avisa, daughter and heiress of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester in 1189 but the marriage was annulled. He then married Isabelle of Angouleme on August 24, 1200

The children of King John:

Henry III

Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Joan of England

Isabella of England

Eleanor of England

Date when King John died: October 19, 1216 at Newark. King John was buried Worcester Cathedral

Cause of the Death of King John: He died after eating peaches

Character of King John: Unscrupulous, cruel, disloyal. A notorious womaniser

Accomplishments or why King John was famous: His treacherous behaviour to his brother King Richard the Lionheart. The Barons rebellion. The Legend of Robin Hood. The murder of  his nephew Arthur. Losing Normandy and signing of theMagna Carta

King John
The story and biography of King John which contains interesting information, facts & the history about the life of King John

Timeline of King John

The story of King John ( Nickname : John Lackland) 
Richard the Lionheart had never had any children, but his brother Geoffrey, who was older than John, had left a son named Arthur, who was about twelve years old, and who was rightly the Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou. King Philip, who was always glad to vex whoever was king of England, took Arthur under his protection, and promised to get Normandy out of John’s hands. However, John had a meeting with him and persuaded him to desert Arthur, and marry his son Louis to John’s own niece, Blanche, who had a chance of being queen of part of Spain.

King John and his nephew Arthur 
Arthur lived at the French King’s court, and when he was sixteen years old, Philip helped him to raise an army and go to try his fortune against his uncle. He laid siege to Mirabeau, a town where his grandmother, Queen Eleanor, was living. John, who was then in Normandy, hurried to her rescue, beat Arthur’s army, made him prisoner and carried him off, first to Rouen, and then to the strong castle of Falaise. Nobody quite knows what was done to him there. The governor, Hubert de Burgh, once found him fighting hard, though with no weapon but a stool, to defend himself from some ruffians who had been sent to put out his eyes. Hubert saved him from these men, but shortly after this good man was sent elsewhere by the king, and John came himself to Falaise. Arthur was never seen alive again, and it is believed that John took him out in a boat in the river at night, stabbed him with his own hand, and threw his body into the river. It is believed that John was guilty of his nephew’s death, and he was fully known to be one of the most selfish and cruel men who ever lived; and so lazy, that he let Philip take Normandy from him, without stirring a finger to save the grand old dukedom of his forefathers.

King John and Pope Innocent 
Matters became much worse in England, when he quarrelled with the Pope Innocent, about who should be archbishop of Canterbury. The Pope wanted a man named Stephen Langton to be archbishop, but the king swore he should never come into the kingdom. Then the Pope punished the kingdom, by forbidding all church services in all parish churches. The was termed putting the kingdom under an interdict. John was not much distressed by this, though his people were; but when he found that Innocent was stirring up the King of France to come to attack him, he thought it time to make his peace with the Pope. So he not only consented to receive Stephen Langton, but he even knelt down before the Pope’s legate, or messenger, and took off his crown, giving it up to the legate, in token that he only held the kingdom from the Pope. It was two or three days before it was given back to him; and the Pope held himself to be lord of England, and made the king and people pay him money whenever he demanded it.

King John and the Magna Carta 
All this time John’s cruelty and savageness were making the whole kingdom miserable; and at last the great barons could bear it no longer. They met together and agreed that they would make John swear to govern by the good old English laws that had prevailed before the Normans came. The difficulty was to be sure of what these laws were, for most of the copies of them had been lost. However, Archbishop Langton and some of the wisest of the barons put together a set of laws–some copied, some recollected, some old, some new–but all such as to give the barons some control of the king, and hinder him from getting savage soldiers together to frighten people into doing whatever he chose to make them. These laws they called Magna Carta, or the great charter; and they all came in armor, and took John by surprise at Windsor. He came to meet them in a meadow named Runnymede, on the bank of the Thames, and there they forced him to sign the charter, for which all Englishmen are grateful to them. But he did not mean to keep it and prepared to take vengeance on the barons.

Louis, the son of Philip of France made King of England and the Death of King John
They found themselves not strong enough to make head against him; so they invited Louis, the son of Philip of France and husband of John’s niece, to come and be their king. He came, and was received in London, while John and his bands of soldiers were roaming about the eastern counties, wasting and burning everywhere till they came to the Wash, the bay between Lincolnshire and Norfolk, where so many rivers run into the sea. There is a safe way across the sands in this bay when the tide is low, but when it is coming in and meets the rivers, the waters rise suddenly into a flood. So it happened to King John; he did get out himself, but all carts with his goods and treasures were lost, and many of his men. He was full of rage and grief, but he went on to the abbey where he meant to sleep. He supped on peaches and new ale, and soon after became very ill. He died in a few days, a miserable, disgraced man, with half his people fighting against him and London in the hands of his worst enemy, Louis the son of the King of France. 

  King Henry II (King of England)

 Henry Plantagenet II

Father of King John

My: 25th Great Grandfather

Cornell Line

John Lackland King of England (1167 – 1216)son of Henry Plantagenet King of England II
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)
son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

King Henry II of England
The following biography, short history and interesting facts provide helpful information for history courses and history coursework about the life of King Henry II King of England:

Country of Origin / Nationality: French / English

Also Known by the Nicknames: “Curt Mantle” (because he wore practical short cloaks), “Fitz Empress” ( meaning the son of an Empress: Matilda) and also “The Lion of Justice” which was a nickname first given to his grandfather Henry I

The word Angevin derives from Anjou (the father of King Henry II was Geoffrey of Anjou)

The word Plantagenet derives from the French plant ‘genet’ and a spray of this broom blossom was worn by King Henry II in his cap. This nickname became “Plantagenet;” which became a kind of surname to the kings of England.

Lifetime: 1133 – 1189

Period he reigned as King of England: 1154–1189

Born: King Henry II was born on 5 March 1133 at Le Mans

Close family connections or relatives: Grandson of King Henry I. He was the son of Queen Matilda and Geoffrey of Anjou

King Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine had the following children:

Henry the Young King (1155–1183)

Richard I (1157–1199)

Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany (1158–1186)

Matilda, Duchess of Saxony (1156–1189)

Leonora of England (1161–1214)

Joan Plantagenet (1165–1199)

John (1167–1216)

King Henry II had two illegitimate children:

Geoffrey, Archbishop of York (1152–1226)

William de Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (1176- 1226)

Henry II Married: Eleanor of Aquitaine on 18 May 1152

Date succeeded to the throne of England: 1154. His coronation was on 19 December 1154

Date when King Henry II died: 6 July 1189 at the Chateau Chinon. King Henry II was buried Fontevraud Abbey 

Character of King Henry II: Clever, strong, determined and spirited. He had a terrible temper

Accomplishments and Achievements or why King Henry II was famous: He was the first of the Plantagenet or Angevin Kings. He made Ireland a part of his vast domain. He struggled withThomas Beckett who ended up being murdered in Canterbury Cathedral

King Henry II
The story and biography of King Henry II which contains interesting information, facts & the history about the life of King Henry II

Timeline of King Henry II

The story of King Henry I ( Nicknames : “Curt Mantle”, “Fitz Empress” and “The Lion of Justice”)
Henry Fitz-Empress was the first king of the Plantagenet family, also called the House of Anjou. He followed King Stephen as King of England. A strong king who pulled down almost all the Castles that had been built in Stephen’s time to gain control and power over the barons. Henry was an extremely powerful king who was lord of nearly half France.

The story of King Henry I and Thomas a Becket
 King Henry II ruled England well and made many laws. One was that, if a priest or monk was thought to have committed any crime, he should be tried by a king’s judge, instead of a bishop. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas a Becket, refused to consent to this law. Thomas a Becket and King Henry II had once been great friends but this refusal led to their argument. King Henry was so angry with him that Thomas a Becket was forced to leave England, and take shelter with the King of France. Six years passed by before a temporary reconciliation was made. The archbishop realised that the king still hated him. Just after his return, Thomas a Becket laid under censure some persons who had given offence. They went and complained to the king, and Henry exclaimed in passion, “Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?” Four of his knights who heard these words set forth to Canterbury. The archbishop guessed why they were come; but he would not flee again, and waited for them by the altar in the cathedral, not even letting the doors be shut. There they slew him. King Henry was devastated by this act which had been prompted by his own words.  After three years King Henry showed his penitence by entering Canterbury Cathedral barefoot and knelt before the tomb of Thomas a Becket. The penitence continued with every priest or monk in turn to strike him with a rod.

The story of King Henry I and Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine
Whilst the dispute with Thomas a Becket was going on, the Earl of Pembroke, called Strongbow, one of Henry’s nobles, had gone over to Ireland and obtained a little kingdom there, which he professed to hold for King Henry. The Kings of England became became Lords of Ireland, though for a long time they only had the Province of Leinster, and were always at war with the Irish around. Henry was a most powerful king; but his latter years were very unhappy. His wife was a difficult woman, and her sons were all disobedient and rebellious. Once all the three eldest sons, Henry, Richard, and Geoffrey, and their mother, left the court, and began to make war upon him. King Henry was much stronger and soon forced them to submit. Queen Eleanor was incarcerated in a strong castle in England as long as he lived. Her sons were much more fond of her than of their father, and they thought this usage so hard, that they were all the more ready to break out against him.

King Henry I and his son, Henry the Young King
In 1170, his eldest son Henry ( known as Henry the Young King) was crowned king of England as Henry III. Historians know him as Henry “the Young King” so as not to confuse him with the later king of this name who was his nephew. The battle between father and son raged on when Henry, who was leading an army against his father, when he was taken ill, and felt himself dying. He sent an entreaty that his father would forgive him, and come to see him. But the young man had so often been false and treacherous, that Henry feared it was only a trick to get him as a prisoner, and only sent his ring and a message of pardon; and young Henry died, pressing the ring to his lips, and longing to hear his father’s voice.

King Henry I and his other sons, Geoffrey, Richard and John
Geoffrey, his third son, was killed by a fall from his horse, and there were only two sons left alive, Richard and John. News came that the Mohammedans in the Holy Land had won Jerusalem back again; and the Pope called on all Christian princes to go on a crusade to recover the Jerusalem and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The kings of England and France, young Richard, and many more, were roused to take the cross; but while arrangements for going were being made, a fresh dispute about them arose, and Richard went away in a rage, got his friends together, and, with King Philip of France to help him, began to make war on King Henry. His father was feeble, and worn out, and could not resist as in former times. He fell ill, and gave up the struggle, saying he would grant all they asked. The list of Richard’s friends whom he was to pardon was brought to him, and the first name he saw in it was that of John, his youngest son, and his favourite, the one who had never before rebelled. His heart was broken and in the year 1189, Henry II died.

Famous Medieval Kings – King Henry II
Interesting facts and information with a short biography about the Medieval Life, Times and history of King Henry II. Additional useful details, facts, history, biography, timeline and information about the lives of all of the Medieval Kings of England and the important events which occurred during their times, can be accessed via the Medieval Life and Times Sitemap. The content of this article on Medieval life and times provides free educational details, facts and information for reference and research for schools, colleges and homework for history courses and history coursework.

 Geoffrey V Plantagenent

Count of Anjou

Father of King Henry II

My: 26th Great Grandfather

Cornell Line

Henry Plantagenet King of England II (1133 – 1189)son of Geoffrey Plantagenent Count of Anjou V
John Lackland King of England (1167 – 1216)son of Henry Plantagenet King of England II
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)
son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

Geoffrey V (24 August 1113 – 7 September 1151), called the Handsome (Frenchle Bel) and Plantagenet, was the Count of AnjouTouraine, and Maine by inheritance from 1129 and then Duke of Normandy by conquest from 1144. By his marriage to the Empress Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England, Geoffrey had a son,Henry Curtmantle, who succeeded to the English throne and founded the Plantagenet dynasty to which Geoffrey gave his nickname. 

Matilda Adelaide Beauclerc 

Queen of England, Holy Roman Empress

Wife of Geoffrey V / Mother of King Henry II

My: 26th Great Grandmother

Cornell Line

Henry Plantagenet King of England II (1133 – 1189)son of Geoffrey Plantagenent Count of Anjou V
John Lackland King of England (1167 – 1216)son of Henry Plantagenet King of England II
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)
son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 Fulk (King of Jerusalem)

Father of Geoffrey V

My: 27th Great Grandfather

Cornell Line

Geoffrey Plantagenent Count of Anjou V (1113 – 1151)son of Fulke Comte Anjou King of Jerusalem V
Henry Plantagenet King of England II (1133 – 1189)son of Geoffrey Plantagenent Count of Anjou V
John Lackland King of England (1167 – 1216)son of Henry Plantagenet King of England II
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Henry III (King of England)

Henry Plantagenet III

My: 23rd Great Uncle

Cornell Line

Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward I (King of England)

Edward Longshanks Plantagenent

My: 1st Cousin 24x Removed

Cornell Line

Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)
son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward II (King of England)

Edward Plantagenent II

My: 2nd Cousin 23x Removed

Cornell Line

Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward III (King of England)

Edward Plantagenent III

My: 3rd Cousin 23x Removed

Cornell Line

Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)
son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Richard II (King of England)

Richard Plantagenent II

My: 5th Cousin 20x Removed

Cornell Line

Edward the Black Plantagenet (1330 – 1376)father of Richard Plantagenet King of England II
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Henry IV (King of England)

Henry Plantagenent IV

My: 5th Cousin 20x Removed

Cornell Line

John of Gaunt Plantagenet 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

  King Henry V (King of England) 

Henry Plantagenent V

My: 6th Cousin 19x Removed

Cornell Line

Henry Plantagenet King of England IV (1366 – 1412)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V
John of Gaunt Plantagenet 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

   King Henry VI (King of England)

Henry Plantagenent VI

My: 7th Cousin 18x Removed

Cornell Line

Henry Plantagenet King of England V (1387 – 1422)father of Henry VI Plantagenet England King of England
Henry Plantagenet King of England IV (1366 – 1412)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V
John of Gaunt Plantagenet 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward IV (King of England)

Edward Plantagenet IV

My: 7th Cousin 18x Removed

Cornell Line

Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York (1411 – 1460)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England IV
Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge (1385 – 1415)father of Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York
Edmund of Langley Prince of England 1st Duke of York Plantagenet (1341 – 1402)father of Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

  King Edward V (King of England)

Edward Plantagenet V

My: 8th Cousin 17x Removed

Cornell Line

Edward Plantagenet King of England IV (1442 – 1483)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England V
Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York (1411 – 1460)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England IV
Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge (1385 – 1415)father of Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York
Edmund of Langley Prince of England 1st Duke of York Plantagenet (1341 – 1402)father of Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Richard III (King of England)

Richard Plantagenent III

My: 7th Cousin 18x Removed

Cornell Line

Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York (1411 – 1460)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England IV
Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge (1385 – 1415)father of Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York
Edmund of Langley Prince of England 1st Duke of York Plantagenet (1341 – 1402)father of Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Henry VII (King of England)

Henry Tudor VII

My: 8th Cousin 17X Removed

Cornell Line

Owen Tudor (1432 – )father of Henry Tudor King of England VII
Henry Plantagenet King of England V (1387 – 1422)father of Owen Tudor
Henry Plantagenet King of England IV (1366 – 1412)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V
John of Gaunt Plantagenet 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Henry VIII (King of England)

Henry Tudor VIII

My: 9th Cousin 16x Removed

Cornell Line

Henry Tudor King of England VII (1457 – 1509)father of Henry Tudor King of England VIII
Owen Tudor (1432 – )father of Henry Tudor King of England VII
Henry Plantagenet King of England V (1387 – 1422)father of Owen Tudor
Henry Plantagenet King of England IV (1366 – 1412)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V
John of Gaunt Plantagenet 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward VI (King of England)

Edward Tudor VI

My: 10th Cousin 15x Remvoed

Cornell Line

Henry Tudor King of England VIII (1491 – 1546)father of Edward Tudor King of England VI
Henry Tudor King of England VII (1457 – 1509)father of Henry Tudor King of England VIII
Owen Tudor (1432 – )father of Henry Tudor King of England VII
Henry Plantagenet King of England V (1387 – 1422)father of Owen Tudor
Henry Plantagenet King of England IV (1366 – 1412)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V
John of Gaunt Plantagenet 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 Queen Mary I 

Mary Tudor daughter of King Henry VIII

My: 10th Cousin 15x Removed

Cornell Line

Henry Tudor King of England VIII (1491 – 1546)father of Edward Tudor King of England VI
Henry Tudor King of England VII (1457 – 1509)father of Henry Tudor King of England VIII
Owen Tudor (1432 – )father of Henry Tudor King of England VII
Henry Plantagenet King of England V (1387 – 1422)father of Owen Tudor
Henry Plantagenet King of England IV (1366 – 1412)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V
John of Gaunt Plantagenet 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

  Queen Elizabeth I  (Queen of England)

Elizabeth Tudor daughter of King Henry VIII

My: 10th Cousin 15x Removed

Cornell Line

Henry Tudor King of England VIII (1491 – 1546)father of Edward Tudor King of England VI
Henry Tudor King of England VII (1457 – 1509)father of Henry Tudor King of England VIII
Owen Tudor (1432 – )father of Henry Tudor King of England VII
Henry Plantagenet King of England V (1387 – 1422)father of Owen Tudor
Henry Plantagenet King of England IV (1366 – 1412)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V
John of Gaunt Plantagenet 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399)father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV
Edward Plantagenet King of England III (1312 – 1377)father of Edward the Black Plantagenet
Edward Plantagenet King of England II (1284 – 1327)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III
Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I (1239 – 1307)father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II
Henry Plantagenet King of England III (1206 – 1272)father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I
Isabella of Angouleme Queen of England DeTaillefer Plantagenet (1180 – 1246)mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III
Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans (1209 – 1272)son of John Lackland King of England
Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall (1252 – 1296)son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford (1282 – 1335)son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall
Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II (1305 – 1343)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford
Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford (1335 – 1365)son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II
Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford (1360 – 1443)son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford
Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir (1382 – 1435)son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford
Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford (1424 – 1469)son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir
Thomas Cornwall (1440 – 1479)son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford
Lawrence Cornwall (1460 – 1512)son of Thomas Cornwall
Robert Cornwall (1495 – 1548)son of Lawrence Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1520 – 1585)son of Robert Cornwall
George Cornwall (1539 – 1616)son of Richard Cornwall
Richard Cornwall (1565 – 1631)son of George Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Sr (1594 – 1656)son of Richard Cornwall
Thomas Cornell Jr (1627 – 1673)son of Thomas Cornell Sr
Stephan Cornell Sr (1656 – 1714)son of Thomas Cornell Jr
Stephan Cornell Jr (1696 – 1767)son of Stephan Cornell Sr
Elijah Cornell Sr (1730 – 1777)son of Stephan Cornell Jr
Ezra Cornell (1770 – 1833)son of Elijah Cornell Sr
John Cornell (1788 – 1860)son of Ezra Cornell
Harrison Cornell (1824 – 1872)son of John Cornell
Lafayette Cornell (1859 – 1937)son of Harrison Cornell
George Everett Cornell (1896 – 1943)son of Lafayette Cornell
Mary Alice Cornell (1931 – 2010)daughter of George Everett Cornell
Eric Elmer Glosserson of Mary Alice Cornell

 Elizabeth Alexandra Windsor II 

Queen of England

(1926-)

My 24th Cousin 1x Removed

Cornell Line

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor II Queen of the United Kingdom 1926-
24th cousin 1x removed

 King George VI of England

(1895-1952)

My 23rd  Cousin 2x Removed

Cornell Line

Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor VI King of United Kingdom 1895-1952
23rd cousin 2x removed